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Pisthetaerus
What an error. Why, the gods will be much more powerful if the birds govern the earth. At present the mortals are hidden beneath the clouds, escape your observation, and commit perjury in your name; [1610] but if you had the birds for your allies, and a man, after having sworn by the crow and Zeus, should fail to keep his oath, the crow would dive down upon him unawares and pluck out his eye.

Poseidon
Well thought of, by Poseidon!

Heracles
[1615] My notion too.

Pisthetaerus
To Triballus.
And you, what's your opinion?

Triballus
Nabasatreu.

Pisthetaerus
D'you see? he also approves. But listen, here is another thing in which we can serve you. If a man vows to offer a sacrifice to some god, and then procrastinates, [1620] pretending that the gods can wait, and thus does not keep his word, we shall punish his stinginess.

Poseidon
Ah! and how?

Pisthetaerus
While he is counting his money or is in the bath, a kite will relieve him, before he knows it, either in coin or in clothes, [1625] of the value of a couple of sheep, and carry it to the god.

Heracles
I vote for restoring them the scepter.

Poseidon
Ask Triballus.

Heracles
Hi! Triballus, do you want a thrashing?

Triballus
Sure, bashum head withum stick.

Heracles
He says, “Right willingly.”

Poseidon
[1630] If that be the opinion of both of you, why, I consent too.

Heracles
Very well! we accord you the scepter.

Pisthetaerus
Ah! I was nearly forgetting another condition. I will leave Here to Zeus, but only if the young Basileia [1635] is given me in marriage.

Poseidon
Then you don't want peace. Let us withdraw.

Pisthetaerus
It matters mighty little to me. Cook, look to the gravy.

Heracles
What an odd fellow this Poseidon is! Where are you off to? Are we going to war about a woman?

Poseidon
[1640] What else is there to do?

Heracles
What else? Why, conclude peace.

Poseidon
Oh! you blockhead! do you always want to be fooled? Why, you are seeking your own downfall. If Zeus were to die, after having yielded them the sovereignty, you would be ruined, for you are the heir of [1645] all the wealth he will leave behind.

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  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 3.6.1
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