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The Scythian has fallen asleep during the previous ode. At the end of it Euripides returns, thinly disguised as an old procuress; the Chorus recognizes him, the Scythian does not; he carries a harp, and is followed by a dancing girl and a young flute-girl.

Euripides
[1160] Women, if you will be reconciled with me, I am willing, and I undertake never to say anything ill of you in future. Those are my proposals for peace.

Leader of the Chorus
And what impels you to make these overtures?

Euripides
to the Chorus
[1165] This unfortunate man, who is chained to the post, is my father-in-law; if you will restore him to me, you will have no more cause to complain of me; but if not, I shall reveal your pranks to your husbands when they return from the war.

Leader of the Chorus
[1170] We accept peace, but there is this barbarian whom you must buy over.

Euripides
I'll take care of that. Come, my little wench, bear in mind what I told you on the road and do it well. Come, go past him and gird up your robe. [1175] And you, you little dear, play us the air of a Persian dance.

Scythian Archer
waking
What is this music that makes me so blithe?

Euripides
Scythian, this young girl is going to practise some dances, which she has to perform at a feast presently.

Scythian Archer
Very well! let her dance and practise; I won't hinder her. [1180] How nimbly she bounds! just like a flea on a fleece.

Euripides
Come, my dear, off with your robe and seat yourself on the Scythian's knee; stretch forth your feet to me, that I may take off your slippers.

Scythian Archer
Ah! yes, seat yourself, my little girl, ah! yes, to be sure. What a firm little titty! [1185] it's just like a turnip.

Euripides
to the flute-girl
An air on the flute, quick! Are you afraid of the Scythian?

Scythian Archer
What a nice arse! Hold still, won't you? Pop it out and pull it back. A nice twat, too.

Euripides
That's so!To the dancing girl Resume your dress, it is time [1190] to be going.

Scythian Archer
Give me a kiss.

Euripides
Come, give him a kiss.

Scythian Archer
Oh! oh! oh! my god, what sweet lips! like Attic honey. But might she not go to bed with me?

Euripides
Impossible, officer; good evening.

Scythian Archer
Oh! oh! old hag, [1195] do me this pleasure.

Euripides
Will you give a drachma?

Scythian Archer
Aye, that I will.

Euripides
Hand over the money.

Scythian Archer
I have not got it, but take my quiver in pledge.

Euripides
Then bring her back.

Scythian Archer
To the dancing girl Follow me, my fine young wench. Old woman, you keep an eye on this man. [1200] But what's your name?

Euripides
Artemisia.

Scythian Archer
I'll remember it. Artemuxia.

He takes the dancing girl away.

Euripides
aside
Hermes, god of cunning, receive my thanks! everything is turning out for the best.To the flute-girl As for you, friend, go along with them. Now let me loose his bonds.To Mnesilochus And you, [1205] directly I have released you, take to your legs and run off full tilt to your home to find your wife and children.

Mnesilochus
I shall not fail in that as soon as I am free.

Euripides
releasing Mnesilochus
There! It's done. Come, fly, before the Scythian lays his hand on you again.

Mnesilochus
That's just what I am doing.

Both depart in haste.

Scythian Archer
returning
[1210] Ah! old woman! what a charming little girl! Not at all a prude, and so obliging! Eh! where is the old woman? Ah! I am undone! And the old man, where is he? Hi, old woman, old woman! Ah! but this is a dirty trick! Artemuxia! she has tricked me, that's what the little old woman has done! Get clean out of my sight, you cursed quiver!Picks it up and throws it across the stage. [1215] Ha! you are well named quiver, for you have made me quiver indeed. Oh! what's to be done? Where is the old woman then? Artemuxia!

Leader of the Chorus
Are you asking for the old woman who carried the lyre?

Scythian Archer
Yes, yes; have you seen her?

Leader of the Chorus
She has gone that way along with the old man.

Scythian Archer
[1220] Dressed in a long robe?

Leader of the Chorus
Yes; run quick, and you will overtake them.

Scythian Archer
Ah! rascally old woman! Which way has she fled? Artemuxia!

Leader of the Chorus
Straight on; follow your nose. But, hi! where are you running to now? Come back, you are going exactly the wrong way.

Scythian Archer
[1225] Ye gods! ye gods! and all this while Artemuxia is escaping.

He runs off.

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