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[2]

In speaking of the founding of Taras, Antiochus says: After the Messenian war1 broke out, those of the Lacedaemonians who did not take part in the expedition were adjudged slaves and were named Helots,2 and all children who were born in the time of the expedition were called Partheniae3 and judicially deprived of the rights of citizenship, but they would not tolerate this, and since they were numerous formed a plot against the free citizens; and when the latter learned of the plot they sent secretly certain men who, through a pretence of friendship, were to report what manner of plot it was; among these was Phalanthus, who was reputed to be their champion, but he was not pleased, in general, with those who had been named to take part in the council. It was agreed, however, that the attack should be made at the Hyacinthian festival in the Amyclaeum4 when the games were being celebrated, at the moment when Phalanthus should put on his leather cap (the free citizens were recognizable by their hair 5); but when Phalanthus and his men had secretly reported the agreement, and when the games were in progress, the herald came forward and forbade Phalanthus to put on a leather cap; and when the plotters perceived that the plot had been revealed, some of them began to run away and others to beg for mercy; but they were bidden to be of good cheer and were given over to custody; Phalanthus, however, was sent to the temple of the god6 to consult with reference to founding a colony; and the god responded, "I give to thee Satyrium, both to take up thine abode in the rich land of Taras and to become a bane to the Iapygians." Accordingly, the Partheniae went thither with Phalanthus, and they were welcomed by both the barbarians and the Cretans who had previously taken possession of the place. These latter, it is said, are the people who sailed with Minos to Sicily, and, after his death, which occurred at the home of Cocalus in Camici,7 set sail from Sicily; but on the voyage back8 they were driven out of their course to Taras, although later some of them went afoot around the Adrias9 as far as Macedonia and were called Bottiaeans. But all the people as far as Daunia, it is said, were called Iapyges, after Iapyx, who is said to have been the son of Daedalus by a Cretan woman and to have been the leader of the Cretans. The city of Taras, however, was named after some hero.

1 743-723 B.C.

2 On the name and its origin, see 8. 5. 4; also Pauly-Wissowa, Real-Encycl. s.v. "Heloten."

3 "Children of Virgins."

4 The temple of Amyclaean Apollo.

5 i.e., by the length of it. According to Plut. Lys. 1 the wearing of long hair by the Spartans dated back to Lycurgus (the ninth century B.C.), but according to Hdt. 1.82 they wore their hair short till the battle of Thyrea (in the sixth century B.C.), when by legal enactment they began to wear it long.

6 At Delphi.

7 Cp. 6. 2. 6.

8 Back to Crete.

9 The Adriatic.

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load focus English (H.C. Hamilton, Esq., W. Falconer, M.A., 1903)
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