previous next
[20]

For those who directed the state in the time of Solon and Cleisthenes did not establish a polity which in name merely was hailed as the most impartial and the mildest of governments, while in practice showing itself the opposite to those who lived under it, nor one which trained the citizens in such fashion that they looked upon insolence as democracy, lawlessness as liberty, impudence of speech as equality, and licence to do what they pleased as happiness,1 but rather a polity which detested and punished such men and by so doing made all the citizens better and wiser.

1 For similar caricatures of the later Athenian democracy see Thuc. 3.82.4 ff., and especially Plat. Rep. 560-561.

load focus Greek (George Norlin)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (3 total)
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Plato, Republic, 560
    • Thucydides, Histories, 3.82.4
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: