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98.

First the Athenians besieged and captured Eion on the Strymon from the Medes, and made slaves of the inhabitants, being under the command of Cimon, son of Miltiades. [2] Next they enslaved Scyros the island in the Aegean, containing a Dolopian population, and colonized it themselves. [3] This was followed by a war against Carystus, in which the rest of Euboea remained neutral, and which was ended by surrender on conditions. [4] After this Naxos left the confederacy, and a war ensued, and she had to return after a siege; this was the first instance of the engagement being broken by the subjugation of an allied city, a precedent which was followed by that of the rest in the order which circumstances prescribed.

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hide References (32 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (12):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Oedipus at Colonus, 916
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 6.99
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.107
    • W. W. How, J. Wells, A Commentary on Herodotus, 7.25
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.10
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 3, 3.46
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER VII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER XCVII
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.36
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.89
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.113
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.97
  • Cross-references to this page (13):
    • The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, KARYSTOS S Euboia, Greece.
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE ARTICLE—ORIGIN AND DEVELOPMENT
    • Herbert Weir Smyth, A Greek Grammar for Colleges, THE PARTICIPLE
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.3.1
    • Raphael Kühner, Bernhard Gerth, Ausführliche Grammatik der griechischen Sprache, KG 1.4.2
    • Harper's, Scyros
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), ATHE´NAE
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), CARYSTUS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), EILE´SIUM
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), NAXOS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), SCYROS
    • Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854), THRA´CIA
    • Smith's Bio, Cimon
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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