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ecstasy alienation of mind, THE TEMPEST, iii. 3. 108;THE COMEDY OF ERRORS, iv. 4. 48;MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, ii. 3. 138;TITUS ANDRONICUS, iv. 1. 126;MACBETH, iii. 2. 22; iv. 3. 170;HAMLET, iii. 1. 160 ; iii. 4. 74, 138, 139; OTHELLO, iv. 1. 79 ; VENUS AND ADONIS, 895 ; A LOVER'S COMPLAINT, 69 ; “ecstasies,” TITUS ANDRONICUS, iv. 4. 21. ( “Ecstasy. . . . In the usage of Shakespeare and some others, it stands for every species of alienation of mind, whether temporary or permanent, proceeding from joy, sorrow, wonder, or any other exciting cause: and this certainly suits with the etymology, ekstasis .” Nares's Gloss. )

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hide References (6 total)
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries from this page (6):
    • William Shakespeare, Macbeth, 3.2
    • William Shakespeare, Macbeth, 4.3
    • William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, 3.1
    • William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, 3.4
    • William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors, 4.4
    • William Shakespeare, The Tempest, 3.3
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