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forty used as “the familiar number on many occasions, where no very exact reckoning was necessary” (STEEVENS) ; “Anciently adopted to express a great many” (STAUNTON) : “forty shillings,” THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, i. 1. 179 ; ‘ “the humour of forty fancies,’” THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, iii. 2. 64 (see humour, etc.); “forty pound,” TWELFTH NIGHT, v. 1. 171 ; “these forty years,” RICHARD II., i. 3. 159 ; “forty moys,” HENRY V., iv. 4. 13 ; “forty year,” 1 HENRY VI., i. 3. 90 ; “these forty hours,” HENRY VIII., iii. 2. 253 ; “some forty truncheoners,” HENRY VIII., v. 4. 49 ; “forty of them,” CORIOLANUS, iii. 1. 243 ; “forty paces,” ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, ii. 2. 233.

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hide References (6 total)
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries from this page (6):
    • William Shakespeare, Anthony and Cleopatra, 2.2
    • William Shakespeare, Coriolanus, 3.1
    • William Shakespeare, Henry V, 4.4
    • William Shakespeare, The First Part of Henry VI, 1.3
    • William Shakespeare, Richard II, 1.3
    • William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Or what you will, 5.1
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