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canker (1 fig. ? sometimes to be referred to 2)
1. eating, spreading sore or ulcer, usu. fig. John V. ii. 14 “the inveterate canker of one wound,” 2H6 I. ii. 18 “the canker of ambitious thoughts,” Tim. IV. iii. 49.
2. ‘worm’ that destroys buds and leaves, also fig. (freq.) Gent. I. i. 43, MND. II. ii. 3, Rom. II. iii. 30, Ham. I. iii. 39 “The canker galls the infants of the spring,” V. ii. 69 “this canker of our nature,” Sonn. xxxv. 4; hence canker-bit, worm-eaten Lr. V. iii. 124, canker-sorrow John III. iv. 82.
3. dog-rose Ado I. iii. 28 “I had rather be a canker in a hedge than a rose in his grace,” 1H4 I. iii. 176; hence canker-bloom Sonn. liv. 5.
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hide References (11 total)
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries from this page (11):
    • William Shakespeare, King Lear, 5.3
    • William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, 1.3
    • William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, 5.2
    • William Shakespeare, Two Gentlemen of Verona, 1.1
    • William Shakespeare, King John, 3.4
    • William Shakespeare, King John, 5.2
    • William Shakespeare, The First Part of Henry IV, 1.3
    • William Shakespeare, The Second Part of Henry VI, 1.2
    • William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, 2.2
    • William Shakespeare, Sonnets, liv
    • William Shakespeare, Sonnets, xxxv
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