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hold vb. (pa. t. and pa. pple. usually “held”; pa. pple. once “holden” 2H6 II. iv. 71, once HILD, q.v.)
A.. Transitive meanings:—
1. to endure, bear Cor. III. ii. 80 “the ripest mulberry That will not the handling,” Tim. I. ii. 161, Ham. V. i. 181 “many pocky corses . . . that will scarce the laying in.”
2. in various uses where ‘have’ or ‘keep’ is now the idiomatic verb Tp. II. i. 66 “our garments . . . . . . their freshness,” MND. I. i. 232 “Things base and vile, h-ing no quantity,” All'sW. V. ii. 3 “when I have held familiarity with fresher clothes,” John I. i. 223 “That h-s in chase mine honour up and down,” 1H4 II. iv. 437 “how he h-s his countenance,” H8 I. iii. 8 “when they hold 'em” (viz. fits of the face), Ham. I. v. 96 “while memory h-s a seat In this distracted globe,” Lr. II. iv. 245 “Hold amity” ; refl.= keep or be (so-and-so) Gent. IV. i. 32, “I . . . held me glad,” Err. III. ii. 69, R3 I. iii. 157, Mac. III. ii. 54 “hold thee still,” Sonn. lxxxv. 1.
3. to keep (one's word) Wiv. V. v. 271 [258].
4. to restrain, keep back, keep waiting, detain (freq.) Gent. I. iii. 2 “sad talk was that Wherewith my brother held you,” Ado. I. i. 214 [206], Tw.N. III. iv. 313, John III. iv. 18 “H-ing the eternal spirit . . . In the vile prison,” Cæs. I. ii. 83 “ me here so long,” II. i. 201 “ him from the Capitol” ; R3 IV. i. 81 “hath held mine eyes from rest,” Mac. III. vi. 25 “From whom this tyrant h-s the due of birth” ; phr. “hold” one's “hand” Lr. III. vii. 72, “hold” one's “tongue” Sonn. cii. 13.
5. to entertain (a feeling, thought) Gent. III. ii. 17 “the good conceit I of thee,” John. III. iv. 90 “You too heinous a respect of grief,” Ham. I. ii. 18 “Holding a weak supposal of our worth.”
6. to esteem at a certain value, regard in a particular way Ado III. ii. 101 “he h-s you well,” All'sW. IV. iii. 345 “men very nobly held,” Tw.N. II. iv. 86, III. iv. 255, 3H6 II. ii. 109 “I thee reverently,” Rom. III. iv. 25, Ham. IV. iii. 61 “if my love thou h-'st at aught.”
7. to offer as a wager Mer.V. III. iv. 62, Shr. III. ii. 86 “I hold you a penny.”
B.. Intransitive meanings:—
8. imper. = Here! take it! Gent. IV. iv. 134, Wiv. I. iii. 86 “, sirrah, bear you these letters,” I. iv. 162, R3 III. ii. 105 “hold, spend thou that” (Qq; Ff “there, drink that for me”), Cæs. I. iii. 117 “Hold, my hand,” Mac. II. i. 4; also “hold thee, hold you” Shr. IV. iv. 17, H5 V. i. 61, Cæs. V. iii. 85.
9. to remain fast or unbroken, not to break or give way Shr. II. i. 147, Wint. IV. ii. [iii.] 36 “If the springe , the cock's mine,” John V. vii. 56, Ham. I. v. 93 “Hold, hold, my heart!,” Cym. I. vi. 69 “Can my sides hold?.”
10. =hold one's hand (freq.) Mac. V. vii. 63. [viii. 34]; hence, to refrain AYL. V. i. 14, H8 Epil. 14.
11. to maintain one's position, ‘hold out’ Ant. III. xi. [xiii.] 170 “Our force by land Hath nobly held.”
12. to continue; also, to continue in one state of mind, be steadfast Wiv. V. i. 2 “I'll ,” Meas. III. i. 174, Wint. IV. iii. [iv.] 36 “Your resolution cannot ,” Tim. II. i. 4, Cæs. I. ii. 296 “if . . . your mind ,” Ham. V. ii. 206; phr. “ friends” Ado I. i. 93.
13. to be valid or true, ‘hold good’ Wiv. I. iii. 92, LLL. IV. ii. 42 “The allusion holds in the exchange,” All'sW. IV. v. 99, H8 II. i. 149; also with an adj. 1H4 II. i. 59 “It h-s current,” Tim. V. i. 4 “hold for true,” Lr. IV. vii. 85 “H-s it true, sir, that . . .?.”
14. to take place R2 V. ii. 52* “hold those justs and triumphs?.”
C.. Phrases:—hold hands with, be on an equality with, match (S.) John II. i. 494; hold in, (1) intr. keep counsel 1H4 II. i. 85; (2) trans. keep silent about Lr. V. iii. 204; hold off, keep away or at a distance, maintain a reserve Troil. I. ii. 311, IV. ii. 17, Ham. II. ii. 309 [302]; hold out, (1) keep out, exclude 1H4 II. i. 93 “will she out water in foul way?,” Rom. II. ii. 67 “stony limits cannot love out,” Tim. I. ii. 113; (2) keep up, persist in 3H6 II. vi. 24 “ out flight” ; (3) endure to the end John IV. iii. 156 “can Hold out this tempest,” 2H4 IV. iv. 117 “ out these pangs” ; (4) remain unsubdued, continue or persist in a course Meas, V. i. 367, LLL. V. ii. 396, Mer.V. IV. i. 448 “ out enemy for ever,” Tw.N. IV. i. 5 “Well held out,” John V. i. 30 “nothing there holds out But Dover Castle” ; with “it” Wiv. IV. ii. 145; hold up, keep going, carry on Wiv. V. v. 111, MND. III. ii. 239, Ado II. iii. 136 [126]. ∥ The phr. “, or cut bow-strings” MND. I. ii. 115* has not yet been satisfactorily explained.
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hide References (49 total)
  • Cross-references in text-specific dictionaries from this page (49):
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