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Abhor, 1) to detest to extremity, to loathe; with an accus.: Ven. 138. Lucr. 195. Lucr. 195 Sonn. 150, 11. Sonn. 150, 11 Pilgr. 165. Gent. IV, 3, 17. Wiv. III, 5, 16. Meas. II, 2, 29. Ado II, 3, 101. LLL V, 1, 20. As II, 3, 28. Tw. II, 5, 219. III, 1, 176. John IV, 3, 111. H8 II, 4, 236. Cor. I, 8, 3. Tim. I, 1, 60. IV, 3, 398. V, 4, 75. Oth. I, 1, 6. II, 1, 236. Cymb. V, 5, 40. With an inf.: “what I a. to name,” Meas. III, 1, 102. “my heart --s to hear him named,” Rom. III, 5, 100. Cymb. IV, 2, 357.
Part. --ed, adjectively, == detested, abominable: “to act her --ed commands,” Tp. I, 2, 273. “--ed slave,” Tp. I, 2, 273 Meas. II, 4, 183. Alls IV, 3, 28. Wint. II, 1, 43. John IV, 2, 224. Troil. V, 3, 17. Cor. I, 4, 32. V, 3, 148. Tit. II, 3, 98. Rom. V, 3, 104. Tim. IV, 3, 20. Tim. IV, 3, 20 V, 1, 63. Mcb. V, 7, 10. Lr. I, 2, 81. V, 3, 210. Cymb. V, 5, 216.
2) to protest against, to refuse as a judge: “I utterly a. you for my judge,” H8 II, 4, 81. Hence in comical imitation of the judicial language: “she that doth call me husband, even my soul doth for a wife a.” Err. III, 2, 164.
3) to fill with horror and loathing: “how --ed my imagination is!” Hml. V, 1, 206 (Qq and M. Edd. how --ed in my imagination it is!). “it doth a. me now I speak the word,” Oth. IV, 2, 162.
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