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Abuse, vb. 1) to put to a wrong use, misapply: “why dost thou a. the bounteous largess given thee to give?” Sonn. 4, 5. “their gross painting might be better used where cheeks need blood, in thee it is --d,” 82, 14. LLL II, 227. “if your lass interpretation should a.” Wint. IV, 4, 364 (misinterpret your behaviour).
2) to put to a bad use: who presently a. it (their inherited gold) Lucr. 864. Lucr. 864 Lucr. 864 As III, 2, 378. H4B IV, 2, 13. H6B V, 1, 172. Cor. V, 6, 86. Ant. III, 6, 33.
3) to use ill, to maltreat: “for my sake even so doth she a. me,” Sonn. 42, 7. “who cannot a. a body dead?” Lucr. 1267. “he shall not a. Robert Shallow,” Wiv. I, 1, 3. I, 4, 5. Meas. III, 2, 215. Err. V, 199. Mids. II, 2, 134. Shr. V, 1, 111. Tw. IV, 2, 51. Tw. IV, 2, 51 R2 II, 3, 137. H5 III, 6, 117. IV, 8, 52. R3 I, 3, 52. H8 I, 3, 28. Lr. II, 2, 156. III, 7, 91. IV, 7, 15. IV, 7, 15 Oth. III, 3, 336. Ant. III, 6, 86.
4) to deface, to disfigure: “thy face is much --d with tears,” Rom. IV, 1, 29. Metaphorically: “a. him to the Moor in the rank garb,” Oth. II, 1, 315 (calumniate him with the Moor as incontinent).
5) to offend, insult: “do not a. my master's bounty by the undoing of yourself,” Ant. V, 2, 43. “you have --d me: 'His meanest garment'!” Cymb. II, 3, 154.
6) to disgrace, dishonour: “my bed shall be --d,” Wiv. II, 2, 306. “this lord, who hath --d me,” Alls V, 3, 299. “shall flight a. your name?” H6A IV, 5, 41. Oth. IV, 2, 14. Per. I, 1, 126.
7) to revile: “hang him, he'll a. us,” Tim. II, 2, 49. “I am of life as honest as you that thus a. me,” Oth. V, 1, 123.
8) to corrupt, to pervert: “to draw forth your noble ancestry from the corruption of --ing time,” R3 III, 7, 199. “wicked dreams a. the curtained sleep,” Mcb. II, 1, 50 (or == deceive?). “charms by which the property of youth and maidhood may be --d,” Oth. I, 1, 174. I, 2, 74. “my sins a. my divination,” Cymb. IV, 2, 351.
9) to deceive: “some enchanted trifle to a. me,” Tp. V, 112. “the prince and Claudio have been mightily --d,” Ado V, 2, 100. As III, 5, 80. IV, 1, 218. Tw. III, 1, 124. V, 22. Wint. II, 1, 141. Cor. III, 1, 58. Tit. II, 3, 87. Hml. II, 2, 632. Lr. IV, 1, 24. IV, 7, 77. V, 1, 11. Oth. IV, 2, 139. Cymb. I, 6, 131. III, 4, 105. III, 4, 105 you are --d == you are mistaken, Cymb. I, 4, 124.
Passages which may be assigned to the 1st as well as the 8th and 9th definitions: “I have heard your royal ear --d,” Meas. V, 139. “she doth a. our ears,” Alls V, 3, 295. “dreams a. the curtained sleep,” Mcb. II, 1, 50. “the whole ear of Denmark is rankly --d,” Hml. I, 5, 38. “apt to have his ear --d,” Lr. II, 4, 310. “to a. Othello's ear,” Oth. I, 3, 401. In all these cases the idea of deception is more or less predominant.
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