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Feel (impf. and part. “felt;” Mcb. IV, 3, 196 p. “feltst,” Err. II, 2, 19). 1) to perceive by the touch; trans.: Meas. I, 2, 166. Err. II, 1, 53. III, 2, 134. IV, 4, 26. Mids. I, 1, 244. Wint. II, 1, 152. Ant. V, 2, 325 etc. “let me f. thy cloak upon me,” Gentl. III, 1, 136. “f. you your legs?” Lr. IV, 6, 65. Absolutely: “each --ing part,” Ven. 892. “the instruments that f.” Wint. II, 1, 154. “instruct, walk, f.” Cor. I, 1, 105. “finds not till it --s,” III, 3, 129. Tim. II, 2, 7. “I understand thy kisses and thou mine, and that's a --ing disputation,” H4A III, 1, 206 (quibbling).
2) to touch, to handle: “my smooth moist hand, were it with thy hand felt,” Ven. 143. “her other tender hand his fair cheek --s,” Ven. 143 Ven. 143 “let me f. your pulse,” Err. IV, 4, 55. V, 243. H5 II, 3, 25. H6B III, 2, 145. Absolutely: “then I felt to his knees,” H5 II, 3, 26.
3) to try, to sound: “howsoever you speak this to f. other men's minds,” H5 IV, 1, 131. “he hath wrote this to f. my affection to your honour,” Lr. I, 2, 94.
4) to perceive by the mind, to have the sense of: “I f. not this deity in my bosom,” Tp. II, 1, 277. “I f. the best is past,” III, 3, 50. “never --s the wanton stings and motions,” Meas. I, 4, 58. “couldst not f. his meaning,” Err. II, 1, 51. “I hope, thou feltst I was displeased,” II, 2, 19. “that I love her, I f.” Ado I, 1, 230. Troil. III, 3, 78. “fierce extremes will not f. themselves,” John V, 7, 14. “now I f. of what coarse metal ye are moulded,” H8 III, 2, 238. “I f. now the future in the instant,” Mcb. I, 5, 58. “to the felt absence now I f. a cause,” Oth. III, 4, 182. With a double acc.: “when thou --est it cold,” Sonn. 2, 14. “my conscience which I then did f. full sick,” H8 II, 4, 204. “I f. me much to blame,” H4B II, 4, 390. “how dost thou f. thyself now?” R3 I, 4, 123. “for then, and not till then, he felt himself, and found the blessedness of being little,” H8 IV, 2, 65. “he --s himself distracted,” Hml. III, 1, 5. With an inf.: --ing it (my heart) “break,” Compl. 275. “now does he f. his title hang loose about him,” Mcb. V, 2, 20. “I f. this youth's perfections . . . to creep in at mine eyes,” Tw. I, 5, 315.
5) to be touched and affected by, to suffer, to enjoy, to experience: Tp. I, 2, 209. Tp. I, 2, 209 Gentl. IV, 4, 177. All's III, 2, 51. H6C IV, 1, 82. H8 III, 1, 144. Rom. III, 5, 76. Rom. III, 5, 76 Tim. V, 1, 74. Mcb. V, 2, 17. Lr. V, 3, 324. Oth. III, 3, 455 (Ff keeps) etc. “the felt absence,” Oth. III, 4, 182. “not imagined, felt,” Cymb. IV, 2, 307. Absolutely: “as if it felt with Scotland,” Mcb. IV, 3, 7.
Feeling == making itself felt, heartfelt, coming from and going to the heart: “have of my suffering youth some --ing pity,” Compl. 178. “frame some --ing line,” Gentl. III, 2, 76. “to whose --ing sorrows I might be some allay,” Wint. IV, 2, 8. “a --ing disputation,” H4A III, 1, 206 (quibbling). “let me weep for such a --ing loss,” Rom. III, 5, 75. “who, by the art of known and --ing sorrows, am pregnant to good pity,” Lr. IV, 6, 226.
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