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Hair (rhyming to “despair:” Lucr. 981. Sonn. 99, 7. to “fair:” Compl. 204. to “bear:” Per. IV, 4, 28. to “ear:” Ven. 147 to tear (lacrima): Ven. 51. Ven. 51 Err. III, 2, 48. Dissyll. in Merch. III, 2, 304) 1) a single filament issuing from the skin: “there's not a h. on's head but 'tis a Valentine,” Gent. III, 1, 192. Ado II, 1, 277. LLL V, 2, 258. Shr. IV, 1, 96. All's V, 3, 77. H4A III, 3, 69. H4B I, 2, 182. Hml. I, 5, 19. Ant. I, 2, 200 etc. Used to denote a trifle: “not a h. perished,” Tp. I, 2, 217. “a rush, a h., a drop of blood, a pin,” Err. IV, 3, 73. Merch. III, 2, 304. IV, 1, 331. John IV, 1, 93. V, 7, 54. H4A III, 1, 140. III, 3, 66. H4B II, 4, 276. H8 III, 2, 259. Denoting exactness of estimation: “requital to a --'s breadth,” Wiv. IV, 2, 3. “'tis not a h. amiss yet,” H4B I, 2, 27 (quibbling). “you'll remember your brother's excuse? To a h.” Troil. III, 1, 157. “if I swerve a h. from truth,” III, 2, 191. Plur. --s == a) single filaments growing on the skin: “if --s be wires,” Sonn. 130, 4. “more faults than --s,” Gent. III, 1, 362. H5 III, 7, 14. Troil. I, 2, 122. Mcb. V, 8, 48. Lr. III, 7, 38. IV, 6, 99. Oth. V, 2, 75 etc. b) the whole covering of the skin: “her golden --s,” Ven. 51. Ven. 51 Ven. 51 Err. III, 2, 48. Ado V, 1, 65. LLL IV, 3, 142. Merch. I, 2, 9. III, 2, 120. John III, 4, 62. John III, 4, 62 John III, 4, 62 H4A II, 4, 514. H4B V, 5, 52. H6C II, 5, 40. Caes. II, 1, 144. Ant. II, 7, 123. Per. IV, 4, 28 (cut his --s) etc.
2) Collectively, the mass of filaments growing from the skin, the covering of the body: “with long dishevelled h.” Ven. 147. Lucr. 400. Lucr. 400 Sonn. 99, 7. Compl. 29. Compl. 29 Tp. IV, 237. Gent. II, 7, 44 “(cut your h.).” IV, 4, 194. Wiv. I, 1, 49. Err. II, 2, 74. Err. II, 2, 74 Err. II, 2, 74 V, 173. Ado II, 3, 36. Ado II, 3, 36 LLL IV, 3, 259. Mids. I, 1, 33. I, 2, 100. IV, 1, 28. Merch. II, 2, 100. V, 158. As III, 4, 7. Wint. IV, 4, 333. John III, 4, 45 etc. “would you desire lime and h. to speak better?” Mids. V, 166. “thy stones with lime and h. knit up in thee,” Mids. V, 166 “boar with bristled h.” II, 2, 31; the same expression used of men struck with horror: “with h. up-staring,” Tp. I, 2, 213. “his h. upreared,” H6B III, 2, 171. “mine h. be fixed on end,” H6B III, 2, 171 R3 I, 3, 304. Caes. IV, 3, 280. Mcb. I, 3, 135. Hml. I, 5, 19. III, 4, 121. “she hath more h. than wit,” Gent. III, 1, 361; cf. Err. II, 2, 82. Err. II, 2, 82 Tw. I, 3, 101. against the h. == against the grain, contrary to the nature of a thing: “you go against the h. of your professions,” Wiv. II, 3, 41. “merry against the h.” Troil. I, 2, 28. “thou desirest me to stop in my tale against the h.” Rom. II, 4, 100 (very obscene quibbling). “the quality and h. of our attempt brooks no division,” H4A IV, 1, 61 (== peculiar nature).
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