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Name, subst. 1) individual appellation: “naming thy n. blesses an ill report,” Sonn. 95, 8. “what is your n.?” Tp. III, 1, 36; Meas. II, 1, 45; Ado IV, 2, 11; Tw. I, 2, 26; III, 1, 106 etc. “repeat their --s,” Gent. I, 2, 7. “his n.” Gent. I, 2, 7 Gent. I, 2, 7 Gent. I, 2, 7 “what do you call your knight's n.?” Wiv. III, 2, 21; Err. III, 1, 53; V, 286; Shr. IV, 5, 55; H5 IV, 7, 13. “could not be distinguished but by --s,” Err. I, 1, 53. “call us by our --s,” II, 2, 168; IV, 3, 3; Cor. V, 1, 9; Tim. I, 1, 187. give a name (like a godfather) “to every fixed star,” LLL I, 1, 89; 93; R2 IV, 256. “friend Simple by your n.” Wiv. III, 1, 3. “which Lion hight by n.” Mids. V, 140. one Snout by n. 157; H5 II, 1, 81. “a very valiant rebel of the n.” H4A V, 4, 62 etc. etc. With of: “the n. of Prosper,” Tp. III, 3, 99. Wiv. II, 1, 72. As III, 2, 381. John V, 2, 19. R3I, 1, 58 etc. Of omitted: “thy stolen n. Coriolanus,” Cor. V, 6, 89.
2) common or generic appellation: thou dost usurp the n. (of king) Tp. I, 2, 454. he couples it to his complaining “--s,” Gent. I, 2, 127. had I more n. for badness (than villain) Meas. V, 59. “a noble duke, in nature as in n.” Tw. I, 2, 25. “I have no n., no title,” R2 IV, 255. “know not what n. to call myself,” R2 IV, 255 had his great n. (of king) “profaned with their scorns,” H4A III, 2, 64. “gave his countenance, against his n., to laugh at gibing boys,” H4A III, 2, 64 “called me all these bitter --s,” R3 I, 3, 236. “a traitor to the n. of God,” I, 4, 210. “let life bear his n.” Tit. III, 1, 249. be thy thoughts imperious, like thy n. (of emperor) IV, 4, 81 etc. etc. With of: “our dear love lose n. of single one,” Sonn. 39, 6. “the n. of king,” Tp. I, 1, 18. “no n. of magistrate,” II, 1, 149. Gent. II, 4, 142. Wiv. V, 5, 239. Meas. III, 1, 39. Err. II, 2, 137. Ado I, 1, 302. John V, 2, 67. Mcb. III, 1, 58. Lr. IV, 3, 27 etc.
By the n. of == in the quality of, as being; “I have wooed Margaret by the n. of Hero,” Ado III, 3, 155. “I arrest thee by the n. of Richard Earl of Cambridge,” H5 II, 2, 145. H5 II, 2, 145 H5 II, 2, 145 and by that n. (of traitor) “must die,” H8 II, 1, 59. “this diamond he greets your wife withal by the n. of most kind hostess,” Mcb. II, 1, 16. In the n. of or in n. of == under the title, as: “to carry me in the n. of foul clothes to Datchet-lane,” Wiv. III, 5, 101. “I'll to him again in n. of Brook,” IV, 4, 76. “thus answer I in n. of Benedick,” Ado II, 1, 179. “now take upon me, in the n. of Time, to use my wings,” Wint. IV, 1, 3. “which comes to me in n. of fault,” III, 2, 61. “received eight thousand nobles in n. of lendings,” R2 I, 1, 89. == by virtue of, by means of: “and in the lawful n. of marrying, to give our hearts united ceremony,” Wiv. IV, 6, 50. cf. “wretched shall France be only in my n.” H6A I, 4, 97. Under n. == under pretence: “he does it under n. of perfect love,” Shr. IV, 3, 12.
3) reputation, character: “my good n.” Lucr. 820. “no man that hath a n., by falsehood and corruption doth it shame,” Err. II, 1, 112. “he hath an excellent good n.” Ado III, 1, 98. III, 3, 14. H4A I, 2, 94. “I am in good n. and fame,” H4B II, 4, 81. “you are in an ill n.” H4B II, 4, 81 “let our nation lose the n. of hardiness and policy,” H5 I, 2, 220. “expected to prove so worthy as since he hath been allowed the n. of,” Cymb. I, 4, 3 etc.
4) renown, honour, eminence: “and for a n., now puts the drowsy and neglected act freshly on me, 'tis surely for a n.” Meas. I, 2, 173. Meas. I, 2, 173 “none of n.” Ado I, 1, 7. R2 II, 3, 56. H5 IV, 8, 110. R3 IV, 5, 8. V, 5, 12. “great n. in arms,” H4A III, 2, 108. V, 1, 98. “that, Talbot dead, great York might bear the n.” H6A IV, 4, 9 (== have all the glory of the war). “he gives my son the whole n. of the war,” Cor. II, 1, 149 etc. Abstr. pro concr.: “our battle is more full of --s than yours,” H4B IV, 1, 154. “Tullus Aufidius, the second n. of men,” Cor. IV, 6, 125.
5) descent, ancestry: “I am from humble, he from honoured n.” All's I, 3, 162. “good alone is good without a n.” II, 3, 136. “thou dislikest of virtue for the n.” II, 3, 136 “the honour of a maid is her n.” III, 5, 13.
6) authority, behalf, part: “I did in your n. receive it,” Gent. I, 2, 40. “charge you in the duke's n. to obey me,” Err. IV, 1, 70. “I have wooed in thy n.” Ado II, 1, 310. III, 3, 177. IV, 2, 40. Shr. V, 1, 92. Wint. III, 2, 119. John III, 1, 140. H6A II, 1, 26 etc. Common phrases of exhortation or obsecration: “a God's n.” H6A I, 2, 102. “i' God's n.” Ado I, 1, 144. V, 1, 319. Shr. I, 2, 195. IV, 5, 1. H4B IV, 1, 227. R3 V, 2, 14 etc. “in the --s of all the Gods at once,” Caes. I, 2, 148. “i' devil's n.” Shr. IV, 3, 92. “i' the n. of Beelzebub,” Mcb. II, 3, 4. “i' the n. of something holy,” Tp. III, 3, 94. “close, in the n. of jesting,” Tw. II, 5, 23. “in the n. of sanctity,” III, 4, 93. “i' the n. of truth,” Mcb. I, 3, 52. “i' the n. of me,” Wint. IV, 3, 54 (the clown's speech. Anon. me-, as abbreviated from mercy). “n. of mercy, when was this?” III, 3, 105. “what an unweighed behaviour hath this Flemish drunkard picked -- with the devil's n. -- out of my conversation?” Wiv. II, 1, 24.
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