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Pursue, 1) to follow, to attend: “your sense --s not mine,” Meas. II, 4, 74. “p. him and entreat him to a peace,” Tw. V, 389. “your love --s a banished traitor,” R2 II, 3, 59. where (to his bed) “eagerly his sickness --d him still,” H8 IV, 2, 25. “p. we him on knees,” Troil. V, 3, 10. “ignomy and shame p. thy life,” V, 10, 34. “--d my humour not --ing his,” Rom. I, 1, 135. “p. me lasting strife,” Hml. III, 2, 232. “Fortune p. thee!” Ant. III, 12, 25.
2) to proceed in, to carry on, to follow up, to continue: “I pray thee, p. sentence,” Merch. IV, 1, 298. “I will p. the amity,” All's II, 5, 15. “I cannot p. this sport to the upshot,” Tw. IV, 2, 76. “had we --d that life,” Wint. I, 2, 71. thus far our bending author hath --d the story, H5 Epil. Wint. I, 2, 71 “a speedier course must we p.” Tit. II, 1, 111. “can vengeance be --d further than death?” Rom. V, 3, 55. “howsoever thou --st this act,” Hml. I, 5, 84. “will they p. the quality no longer than they can sing?” Hml. II, 2, 363. “she hath --d conclusions infinite of easy ways to die,” Ant. V, 2, 358.
3) to follow with a view to overtake, to chase; absol.: “clap on more sails, p.” Wiv. II, 2, 142. “when cowardice --s,” Mids. II, 1, 234. H6C I, 4, 22. R3 III, 2, 28. Transitively: “p. these fearful creatures,” Ven. 677. Ven. 677 Err. V, 155. Mids. I, 1, 163. Mids. I, 1, 163 II, 1, 188. II, 1, 188 Shr. V, 2, 47. Tw. I, 1, 23. III, 4, 144. H4B IV, 2, 120. H6B V, 3, 26. H6C I, 1, 2. I, 4, 5. II, 6, 33. Cor. III, 1, 309. IV, 6, 94. Lr. II, 1, 45. Lr. II, 1, 45 Lr. II, 1, 45 Oth. II, 3, 230. Cymb. III, 5, 100. Cymb. III, 5, 100 IV, 2, 157.
4) to persecute, to treat with hostility, to seek to injure: “p. him with any further revenge,” Wiv. IV, 2, 221. “that with such vehemency he should p. faults proper to himself,” Meas. V, 109. “will you the knights shall to the edge of all extremity p. each other, or shall be divided by any voice or order of the field?” Troil. IV, 5, 69.
5) to follow with a desire to obtain, to strive to gain: “they fright him, but he still --s his fear,” Lucr. 308. “possessing or --ing no delight,” Sonn. 75, 11. “I have --d her as love hath --d me,” Wiv. II, 2, 208. Wiv. II, 2, 208 Wiv. II, 2, 208 “our natures do p. a thirsty evil,” Meas. I, 2, 132. “she shall p. it with the soul of love,” Mids. II, 1, 182. “he --d my life,” Hml. IV, 7, 5. “if I knew what hoop should hold us stanch, from edge to edge o' the world I would p. it,” Ant. II, 2, 118. “would I might never o'ertake --d success,” V, 2, 103. Absol.: “emulation hath a thousand sons that one by one p.” Troil. III, 3, 157.
In R3 II, 3, 43 Ff men's minds mistrust --ing dangers, Qq ensuing dangers.
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