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Patience, 1) a calm temper in grief and suffering: “p. tame to sufferance,” Sonn. 58, 7. “do not press my tongue-tied p. with too much disdain,” 140, 2. Tp. V, 140. Ado IV, 1, 256. V, 1, 10. V, 1, 10 V, 1, 10 LLL I, 1, 197. Mids. I, 1, 152. III, 1, 197. As I, 3, 80. V, 2, 103. V, 4, 193. Shr. II, 297. Wint. III, 2, 33 etc. Personified as a fem.: Troil. I, 1, 28. Oth. IV, 2, 63. cf. Tp. V, 140. Err. II, 1, 32. As IV, 3, 13. Represented by statues placed on graves: “she sat like P. on a monument, smiling at grief,” Tw. II, 4, 117. “yet thou dost look like P. gazing on kings' graves and smiling extremity out of act,” Per. V, 1, 139.
2) quiet perseverance in waiting for sth.: “O, p.! the statue is but newly fixed,” Wint. V, 3, 46. “linger your p. on,” H5 II Chor. H5 II Chor. H6B I, 4, 18. H8 V, 2, 19.
3) calmness, composure; opposed to passionateness: “where thou with p. must my will abide,” Lucr. 486. Lucr. 486 Lucr. 486 Lucr. 486 “I'm out of p.” Tp. I, 1, 58. “have p.” Gent. II, 2, 1. V, 4, 27. Wiv. III, 1, 55. IV, 2, 28. Meas. IV, 3, 123. V, 116. V, 116 Err. II, 1, 32. Err. II, 1, 32 Err. II, 1, 32 III, 1, 85. III, 1, 85 IV, 2, 16. V, 174. LLL IV, 3, 165. Mids. III, 2, 66. Mids. III, 2, 66 As IV, 3, 13. Shr. I, 2, 45. III, 2, 21. All's III, 2, 50. Tw. II, 5, 83. Rom. I, 5, 91 (cf. Perforce). Hml. III, 4, 124. V, 1, 317. V, 1, 317 Per. V, 1, 145 etc. take p. == have p. Lr. II, 4, 140. “take your p. to you,” Wint. III, 2, 232. “you must take your p. to you,” H8 V, 1, 106. “we will not wake your p.” Ado V, 1, 102; cf. “to wake our peace,” R2 I, 3, 132 (and the contrary: “peace shall go sleep,” IV, 139). “lest thou move our p.” R3 I, 3, 248; cf. Err. II, 1, 32; Meas. V, 235; Mids. III, 2, 161.
4) indulgence, forbearance, leniency: “my p., more than thy desert, is privilege for thy departure hence,” Gent. III, 1, 159. “I do entreat your p. to hear me speak the message,” IV, 4, 116. “an old abusing of God's p.” Wiv. I, 4, 5. “I know not how to pray your p.” Ado V, 1, 280. “begged my p.” Mids. IV, 1, 63. “your p. for my long abode,” Merch. II, 6, 21. “ours be your p. then,” All's V, 3, 339. “your p. this allowing, I turn my glass,” Wint. IV, 1, 15 etc.
Hence == permission: “but only, with your p., that we may taste of your wine,” H6A II, 3, 78. “under your p.” Tit. II, 3, 66. “they stay upon your p.” Hml. III, 2, 112. by your p. == by your leave: Tp. III, 3, 3. As V, 4, 186. Tw. II, 1, 3. H5 III, 6, 31. R3 IV, 1, 15. Cor. I, 3, 81. I, 9, 55. Lr. V, 3, 59. “by your gracious p.” Oth. I, 3, 89.
Misapplied by Costard: LLL I, 2, 170.
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