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Sirrah (never plur.) a compellation used in addressing comparatively inferior persons: Tp. V, 287. Tp. V, 287 Gent. II, 1, 7. III, 1, 204. III, 1, 204 Wiv. I, 1, 281. I, 3, 88. III, 2, 21. IV, 1, 19. Meas. III, 2, 20. IV, 2, 1. IV, 2, 1 IV, 3, 22. V, 214. V, 214 Err. II, 2, 211. V, 274. LLL I, 1, 283. V, 1, 36. Merch. I, 2, 146. II, 5, 38. III, 5, 51. As III, 2, 168. Shr. Ind. I, 74. I, 1, 226. I, 1, 226 I, 1, 226 I, 2, 16. II, 109. III, 1, 15. IV, 1, 153. All's I, 3, 72. All's I, 3, 72 II, 3, 208. II, 3, 208 II, 4, 57. V, 2, 55. V, 3, 234. Tw. V, 148. John I, 90. John I, 90 R2 II, 2, 90. H4A II, 4, 6. III, 3, 153. III, 3, 153 IV, 2, 80. H4B I, 2, 1. II, 1, 6. II, 2, 176. II, 4, 403. H5 IV, 7, 151. H6A I, 4, 1. III, 1, 62. III, 4, 35. H6B I, 3, 222. II, 1, 117. II, 1, 117 II, 3, 81. IV, 2, 104. V, 1, 111. H6C V, 6, 6. R3 III, 2, 98. H8 V, 4, 30. Troil. III, 2, 7. Cor. V, 2, 55. V, 3, 75. Tit. III, 2, 75. IV, 3, 78. IV, 4, 47. Rom. I, 2, 34. IV, 2, 2. IV, 4, 15. V, 3, 280. Tim. III, 1, 41. Caes. III, 1, 10. IV, 3, 134. V, 3, 25. V, 3, 25 Mcb. III, 1, 45. IV, 2, 30. Hml. V, 1, 127. Lr. I, 2, 83. I, 4, 48. I, 4, 48 I, 4, 48 I, 4, 48 II, 2, 74. III, 4, 184. IV, 1, 53. Oth. III, 4, 1. Ant. II, 3, 10. Cymb. III, 5, 80. Cymb. III, 5, 80 Cymb. III, 5, 80 Resented by one who thinks himself a gentleman: “yours, s.? I am a gentleman, sir, and my name is Conrade,” Ado IV, 2, 14. Used between equals of low degree: Gent. II, 5, 11. Err. III, 1, 83. H4A II, 1, 67. H4B II, 4, 16. Lr. I, 4, 109. Implying disrespect when used to persons of note: Wiv. IV, 2, 142. Err. IV, 1, 81. John II, 140. H4A I, 3, 118. V, 4, 130. or at least an unbecoming familiarity: “and, s., I have cases of buckram,” H4A I, 2, 200. Followed by a noun proper or appellative: “s. Costard,” LLL III, 121. “s. Grumio,” Shr. I, 2, 5. V, 2, 95. “s. villain,” I, 2, 19. “s. young gamester,” II, 402. “s. Biondello,” IV, 4, 10. V, 2, 86. “s. carrier,” H4A II, 1, 46. “s. Jack,” II, 2, 73. “s. beadle,” H6B II, 1, 148. “s. Claudius,” Caes. IV, 3, 300. Used as an address to a woman: “s. Iras, go,” Ant. V, 2, 229.
Sometimes forming part of a soliloquy and addressed to an imaginary person or rather to the speaker himself (always preceded by ah): “ah, s., a body would think this was well counterfeited,” As IV, 3, 166. “ah, s., quoth-a, we shall do nothing but eat and make good cheer,” H4B V, 3, 17. “ah, s., this unlooked-for sport comes well,” Rom. I, 5, 31. “ah, s., by my fay, it waxes late,” Rom. I, 5, 31
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