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Soul* (sometimes fem.: Lucr. 719. Lucr. 719 John III, 3, 21. R2 II, 2, 64. H6C II, 1, 74. II, 6, 42. R3 III, 5, 27. Hml. II, 2, 579. III, 2, 68. cf. on the other hand: R2 V, 5, 6) the immaterial part of man (and of beasts, when considered as governed by human affections: Merch. IV, 1, 132. 135), the immortal spirit which inhabits the body and is the cause of life and sense: “a knife, that thence her s. unsheathed,” Lucr. 1724. “poor s., the centre of my sinful earth,” Sonn. 146, 1. Sonn. 146, 1 “body and s.” Ado III, 3, 3. IV, 1, 250. “within this wall of flesh there is a s. counts thee her creditor,” John III, 3, 21. “sluiced out his innocent s.” R2 I, 1, 103. “my --'s palace is become a prison: ah, would she break from hence,” H6C II, 1, 74. “whose s. is that which takes her heavy leave?” II, 6, 42. “if thy s. check thee that I come so near,” Sonn. 136, 1. “lending credent s. to that strong-bonded oath,” Compl. 279. “the prophetic s. of the wide world dreaming on things to come,” Sonn. 107, 1. “it goes on, as my s. prompts it,” Tp. I, 2, 420. “his looks are my --'s food,” Gent. II, 7, 15. “to qualify the laws, as to your s. seems good,” Meas. I, 1, 67. “men indued with intellectual sense and --s,” Err. II, 1, 22. “now is his s. ravished! is it not strange that sheeps' guts should hale --s out of men's bodies,” Ado II, 3, 60. 62 (cf. Tw. II, 3, 61). “will you with free and unconstrained s. give me this maid?” IV, 1, 25. “come into the eye and prospect of his s.” IV, 1, 25 “as sure as I have a thought or a s.” IV, 1, 25 “my soul doth tell me Hero is belied,” V, 1, 42. “entreat out of a new-sad s.” LLL V, 2, 741. “whose yoke my s. consents not to give sovereignity,” Mids. I, 1, 82. “made love to Helena and won her s.” Mids. I, 1, 82 “by that which knitteth --s,” Mids. I, 1, 82 “you must join in --s to mock me too,” III, 2, 150 (cf. “do in consent shake hands to torture me,” Sonn. 28, 6). “deny your love, so rich within his s.” Sonn. 28, 6 “shall she be placed in my constant s.” Merch. II, 6, 57. “with an unquiet s.” III, 2, 308. “not on thy sole, but on thy s. thou makest thy knife keen,” Merch. IV, 1, 123 (the same quibble in II, 4, 68 and Caes. I, 1, 15). “and all those swearings keep as true in s.” Tw. V, 277. “now hath my s. brought forth her prodigy,” R2 II, 2, 64. “that all have torn their --s by turning them from me,” III, 3, 83. “I'll prove the female to my s.” V, 5, 6. “never did young man fancy with so eternal and so fixed a s.” Troil. V, 2, 166. “this is the world's s., and just of the same piece is every flatterer's spirit,” Tim. III, 2, 71. “could force his s. so to his own conceit,” Hml. II, 2, 579. “it offends me to the s. to hear . . .,” III, 2, 10. “I am glad at s.” Oth. I, 3, 196 etc. etc. Figuratively: “dear father, s. and substance of us all,” Tit. I, 374. “s. of Rome!” Caes. II, 1, 321. With emphasis: “if none of them have s. in such a kind,” Troil. I, 3, 285. “of no more s. nor fitness for the world than camels in the war,” Cor. II, 1, 266. “that might to half a s. and to a notion crazed say 'Thus did Banquo',” Mcb. III, 1, 83. “these fellows have some s.” Oth. I, 1, 54. Used in swearing: “sir, as I have a s., she is an angel,” H8 IV, 1, 44. “so thrive my s.” Rom. II, 2, 153. “by my s.!” Ado V, 1, 284. Ado V, 1, 284 LLL IV, 1, 142. H4A IV, 1, 86. H6A II, 4, 107. “I charge you, on your --s,” Ado IV, 1, 14. “on my s.!” Ado IV, 1, 14 John V, 1, 43. H4A I, 3, 81. Oth. V, 2, 181 etc. Represented as the seat of real, not only professed, sentiments: “I have debated, even in my s., what sorrow I shall breed,” Lucr. 498. “hear my s. speak,” Tp. III, 1, 63. “whom my very s. abhors,” Gent. IV, 3, 17. Err. III, 2, 163. (I liked) “never any with so full s.” Tp. III, 1, 44. “we have with special s. elected him,” Meas. I, 1, 18. “were it not against our laws, my s. should sue as advocate for thee,” Err. I, 1, 146. “against my --'s pure truth why labour you to make it wander in an unknown field?” III, 2, 37. “think you in your s. the Count Claudio hath wronged Hero?” Ado IV, 1, 331. “there is some s. of goodness in things evil,” H5 IV, 1, 4 (== something really good). “speak it from your --s,” H6B III, 1, 247. “wherein my s. recorded the history of all her secret thoughts,” R3 III, 5, 27. “from my s. I mourn for yours,” IV, 1, 89. “from my s. I love your daughter,” IV, 4, 255. IV, 4, 255 “tell me true, even in the s. of sound good fellowship,” Troil. IV, 1, 52. “that I may swear unto my s. to right your wrongs,” Tit. III, 1, 279. Oth. I, 1, 251.
In a religious sense, 1) the moral agent liable to sin: “his --'s fair temple is defaced,” Lucr. 719. “sits Sin, to seize the --s that wander by him,” Lucr. 719 Lucr. 719 “thinkest thou I'll endanger my s. gratis?” Wiv. II, 2, 16. II, 3, 40. Meas. II, 2, 73. Meas. II, 2, 73 II, 4, 41. II, 4, 41 II, 4, 41 II, 4, 41 V, 485 etc. 2) a departed spirit: Gent II, 7, 38. Mids. V, 308. Tw. I, 5, 74. John V, 7, 72. Ant. IV, 14, 51 etc.
Periphrastical use: “the folly of my s. dares not present itself,” Wiv. II, 2, 253 (== my folly). “bless my s.” III, 1, 11 (== bless me). “our s. cannot but yield you forth to public thanks,” Meas. V, 6 (== we cannot). “so befall my s. as this is false,” Err. V, 208. to knit my s. “to an approved wanton,” Ado IV, 1, 45. “my father loved Sir Rowland as his s.” As I, 2, 247 (== as himself); cf. Gent. V, 4, 37, H4A V, 4, 20 and Tit. I, 373. for mine (demerits) “fell slaughter on their --s,” Mcb. IV, 3, 227. “since my dear s. was mistress of her choice,” Hml. III, 2, 68. “heaven defend your good --s that you think,” Oth. I, 3, 267. cf. Tp. I, 2, 420. Gent. II, 7, 15. Meas. I, 1, 67. Ado IV, 1, 25. Mids. I, 1, 82. Mids. I, 1, 82 III, 2, 229. Hml. II, 2, 579 etc.
Similarly, often, == person, creature: “so o'er this sleeping s. doth Tarquin stay,” Lucr. 423. “free that s. which wretchedness hath chained,” Lucr. 423 “guiltless --s,” Lucr. 423 “leave the faltering feeble --s alive,” Lucr. 423 “all ignorant that s. that sees thee without wonder,” Pilgr. 65. “no s.” Tp. I, 2, 29. “not a s. but felt a fever,” Tp. I, 2, 29 “the fraughting souls within her,” Tp. I, 2, 29 “the fair s. herself,” II, 1, 129. “tie the wiser --s to thy false seeming,” Meas. II, 4, 14. “a wretched s., bruised with adversity,” Err. II, 1, 34. “an honest s.” Ado III, 5, 41. “that unlettered small-knowing s.” LLL I, 1, 254. “mirth cannot move a s. in agony,” V, 2, 867. “pretty s.” Mids. II, 2, 76. “an evil s. producing holy witness,” Merch. I, 3, 100. “sweet s., let's in,” V, 49. “a gracious innocent s.” Wint. II, 3, 29. “to lay so dear a trust on any s. removed,” H4A IV, 1, 35. “there is no English s.” H8 I, 1, 146. “O this false s. of Egypt,” Ant. IV, 12, 25. “no single s. can we set eye on,” Cymb. IV, 2, 130. poor s., a term of pity: Tp. I, 2, 9. Meas. V, 46. Meas. V, 46 Err. I, 1, 108. IV, 2, 40. IV, 4, 62. IV, 4, 62 LLL IV, 1, 94. Mids. III, 2, 161. V, 134. H6B II, 1, 84. R3 II, 1, 87. R3 II, 1, 87 IV, 1, 64. 91 etc.
Denoting the chief part and quintessence of a thing: “grace, being the s. of your complexion,” Meas. III, 1, 187. “she shall pursue it with the s. of love,” Mids. II, 1, 182. “therein should we read the very bottom and the s. of hope,” H4A IV, 1, 50. “what is thy s. of adoration?” H5 IV, 1, 262. “the mortal Venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's invisible s.” Troil. III, 1, 35. “my very s. of counsel,” III, 2, 141. “he's the very s. of bounty,” Tim. I, 2, 215. “brevity is the s. of wit,” Hml. II, 2, 90. “from the body of contraction plucks the very s.” III, 4, 47. my s., a term of endearment applied by lovers to their mistresses: Mids. III, 2, 246. Tw. I, 5, 288. Rom. II, 2, 165. III, 5, 25. Cymb. V, 5, 263. cf. LLL IV, 2, 104.
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