previous next

IULIA TRADUCTA (Tarifa) Cádiz, Spain.

Town 22 km SW of Algeciras, which Strabo (3.140) calls Ioulia Ioza, and others Iulia Ioza. Ioza is the Latin equivalent of Transducta or Traducta (Ptol. 2.4.6; Marcianus 2.9; Ravenna Cosmographer 305.12). P. Mela (2.96), however, places Tingentera in this place.

The town was founded in the Augustan period as Colonia Iulia Traducta, since some of the inhabitants of Zelis (Algiers) and Tingis (Tangiers), in North Africa, had been transferred to it. However, since Pliny (5.2) states that Tingis was named Traducta Iulia by the emperor Claudius when he converted it into a colony, some scholars have concluded that the population that came from the African coast returned home in the time of Claudius. The town of Iulia Traducta minted coins only in the Imperial age; the obverse carried the head of Augustus or produce such as tuna, grapes, or wheat, and the reverse the name of the mint, IVL TRAD.

Fragments of ancient pottery and coins have been found in Tarifa, but until recently its surroundings have been explored more than the town itself. Copper Age graves have been found in the Algarbes area, near Tarifa; grave goods, now in the Seville Archaeological Museum, include handmade pottery in the form of a tulip; also arrow points and flint knives, polished axes, some bronze pieces, bone objects used for ornament or as pendants, and a fragment of a gold sword hilt with checkerboard decoration. Remains from the same period have been found throughout the course of the Ebro.

Tarifa probably forms part of an ancient tell. Fragments of Campanian pottery indicate that excavation would be worthwhile.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

E. Romero de Torres, Catálogo Monumental de España. Provincia de Cádiz (1934) 171, 230, 270-71, 310, 356, 361-62, 460, 549; A. García y Bellido, “Las colonias romanas de Hispania,” Anuario de Historia del Derecho Español 29 (1959) 493ff.

C. FERNANDEZ-CHICARRO

hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: