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Since Chrysogonus was a favorite of Sulla's, Cicero had to be careful not to appear to attack the Dictator. Hence he interrupts the story of the plot to express his certainty that Sulla had not known what was going on, and to excuse him on the ground of the pressure of public business.

certo scio, I feel sure: § 322, c (151, c).

neque enim: negative of et enim, introducing a point obvious or indisputable, for, you see, it is not surprising (cf. p. 4, l. 16, above) ; § 324, h (1 56, d) ; cf. H.-B. 311,6 and b.

mirum [est] is the apodosis and si . . . animadvertat (p. 6, l. 4) is the protasis. mirum [est] is the main clause of the whole period ; the long parenthesis (lines 29-4) consists of a string of causal clauses with cum (which may be translated either when or since).

praeparet, must provide for.

pacis . . . rationem, i.e. the ordering of the new constitution.

si aliquid (more emphatic than si quid) non animadvertat, if there is something he does not notice protasis with mirum [est], above ; § 572, b, N. (333, b, R.) ; G. 542, N.1.

ut . . . moliantur (clause of purpose), that as soon as he turns away his eyes they may get up something of this sort.

despexerit, perf. subj.: § 593 (342); B. 324, 1; G. 663, 1; H. 652 (529, ii); H.-B. 539; for fut. perf., § 484, c (286, end) ; B. 269, I, b; G. 514; H. 541, 2 (496, ii); H.-B. 470, 1, footnote 1.

huc accedit, add to this. Notice the difference of order and consequently of emphasis between huc accedit (add to this) here, and accedit illa (there is in addition) in sect. 4, above.

quamvis felix sit, however fortunate he may be: § 527, a (313, a) ; B. 309, 1 ; G. 606; H. 586,11(515, iii); H.-B. 532, 2. Sulla was so impressed with his own good fortune, that he assumed the agnomen Felix, which implied, according to ancient notions, the peculiar favor of the gods (See Manil., sect. 47.)

familia, household of slaves and dependents (see under sect 35).

qui habeat as to have § 535 a (320 a) B. 283, 2; G 631 2; H 589 ii (500 i) H.-B. 521, 1.

libertum: a freedman still remained attached to his former master (now his patronus) often lived in his family did various services for him, and stood towards him in relation somewhat like that of a son under the patria potestas. Towards others he was a libertinus fully free but with some political disqualifications ; towards his former master he was a libertus.


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hide References (9 total)
  • Commentary references from this page (9):
    • Cicero, On Pompey's Command, 47
    • Cicero, For Sextus Roscius of Ameria, 4
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 322
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 324
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 484
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 527
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 535
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 572
    • A. A. Howard, Benj. L. D'Ooge, G. L. Kittredge, J. B. Greenough, Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, 593
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