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aurōra , ae, f. acc. to Curtius, a reduplicated form for ausosa, from Sanscr. ush, to burn; cf. αὔως ηώς, dawn; ἥλιος, the sun; and Etrusc. Usil, the god of the sun; but its idea of brightness, splendor, easily connects it with the same group as aurum; v. aes.
I. A.. The dawn, daybreak, morning (mostly poet.): est autem aurora diei clarescentis exordium et primus splendor aëris, quae Graece ἠώς dicitur, Isid. Orig. 5, 31, 14: “usque ab aurorā ad hoc quod diei est,Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 8: “Nec nox ulla diem neque noctem aurora secutast,Lucr. 2, 578; 4, 538; 4, 711; 5, 657; Cic. Arat. 65: “ad primam auroram,Liv. 1, 7, 6; Plin. 11, 12, 12, § 30.—
B. Personified, the goddess of the morning, Gr. ᾿Ηώς, daughter of Hyperion (hence Hyperionis, Ov. F. 5, 159), wife of Tithonus (hence Tithonia conjunx, Ov. F. 3, 403, and Tithonia, id. ib. 4, 943), and mother of Memnon, Verg. A. 4, 585: “Aurora novo cum spargit lumine terras,Lucr. 2, 144; imitated by Verg. l.l.; “9, 459: Iamque rubescebat stellis Aurora fugatis,id. ib. 3, 521; 6, 535; “7, 26: Proxima prospiciet Tithono Aurora relicto,Ov. F. 1, 461; id. M. 13, 576 sq.; “she robbed Procris of her husband, Cephalus,id. ib. 7, 703; “but gave him back,id. ib. 7, 713.—
II. Meton., the East, the Orient: “ab Aurorae populis et litore rubro,Verg. A. 8, 686: “Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit,Ov. M. 1, 61: “quae (terrae) sunt a Gadibus usque Auroram et Gangen,Juv. 10, 2; cf. Verg. A. 7, 606 sq.; so Claud. Laus Seren. Reg. 116; id. in Eutr. 1, 427; “also,the people of the East, id. Laud. Stil. 1, 154; id. in Rufin. 2, 100; id. B. Gild. 61; id. in Eutr. 2, 527.
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