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cornix , īcis, f. kindred with corvus and κορώνη,
I.a crow, Lucr. 5, 1083: “rauca,id. 6, 753: “garrula,Ov. M. 2, 548: “loquax,id. F. 2, 89; Plin. 10, 12, 14, § 30 al.; “renowned as being long lived,Lucr. 5, 1083; Cic. Tusc. 3, 28, 69; Hor. C. 3, 17, 13; Ov. M. 7, 274; Plin. 7, 48, 49, § 153 et saep.; “its appearance on the left side was considered as a favorable omen,Plaut. As. 2, 1, 12; Cic. Div. 1, 39, 85; Verg. E. 9, 15; Phaedr. 3, 18, 12; cf. Suet. Dom. 23; “and its cries as a sign of rain,Verg. G. 1, 388; Hor. C. 3, 17, 13.—Its eyes were used as a charm, Prop. 4 (5), 5, 16.Paley ad loc.—From its custom of attacking its prey first in the eyes is taken the proverb: cornicum oculos configere, to delude or deceive the most wary (Anglice, to catch a weasel asleep), Cic. Mur. 11, 25 (cited ap. Quint. 8, 3, 22); “and ellipt.: cornici oculum,id. Fl. 20, 46 (cf. Schol. Bobiens. V. 2, p. 242 Orell.).
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