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cărīna , ae, f. cf. κάρυον, cornu.
I. The keel of a ship, Plaut. Mil. 3, 3, 42; Caes. B. G. 3, 13; id. B. C. 1, 54; Liv. 22, 20, 2; 28, 8, 14; Tac. A. 2, 6; Curt. 7, 3, 9; 10, 1, 19; Ov. M. 14, 552; id. P. 4, 3, 5.—In the poets very freq. (in Ovid's Met. alone about thirty times).—
II. Meton.
A. (Pars pro toto.) A vessel, boat, ship, Enn. Ann. 379; 476; 560 Vahl.; Cat. 64, 10; 64, 250; Prop. 3 (4), 9, 35; Verg. G. 1, 303; 1, 360; 2, 445; id. A. 2, 23; 4, 398; 5, 158; Hor. C. 1, 4, 2; 1, 14, 7; id. Epod. 10, 20; Ov. M. 1, 134.—
B. Transf., of objects of similar form; of the shells of nuts, Plin. 15, 22, 24, § 88; of the bodies of dogs, Nemes. Cyneg. 110 Wernsd.; cf. Schol. Stat. Th. 11, 512 and 2. carino.—
2. Esp. freq. as nom. propr.: Cărīnae , ārum, f., the Keels, a celebrated quarter in the fourth region of Rome, between the Cœlian and Esquiline Hills, now S. Pietro in vincoli, Varr. L. L. 5, § 46 sq.; Cic. Q. Fr. 2, 3, 7; Liv. 26, 10, 1; Hor. Ep. 1, 7, 48; Suet. Gram. 15 al.; cf. “Becker, Antiq. 1, p. 522 sq.: lautae,Verg. A. 8, 361 Serv.—Here stood also the house of Pompey, Suet. Tib. 15; id. Gram. 15; hence the humorous play upon the word carinae, ships' keels, Vell. 2, 77, 1; Aur. Vict. Vir. Ill. 84; cf. Dio. Cass. 48, 38, p. 555.
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