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collum , i, n. (ante-class. access. form collus , i, m., Naev., Cato, Lucil., Att., Caecil., Varr. ap. Non. p. 200, 14 sq.; Plaut. Capt. 2, 2, 107; 4, 3, 2; and, acc. to Non. l. l., also id. Am. 1, 1, 289:
I.nec collos mihi Calvus persuaserit,Quint. 1, 6, 42; Front. Ep. ad M. Caes. 2, 16) [cf. Germ. Hals].
2. In partic.
a. As a symbol of servitude: “dare colla triumpho,Prop. 2 (3), 10, 15.eripe turpi Colla jugo,Hor. S. 2, 7, 92.—
b. (As in Engl., it costs him his neck, etc.) A symbol of life: “actum'st de collo meo,Plaut. Trin. 2, 4, 194; cf.: “posuit collum in Pulvere Teucro,Hor. C. 4, 6, 11.—
c. Collum torquere, obtorquere, obstringere alicui, legal t. t., to seize by the neck and drag before a tribunal or to prison: “priusquam obtorto collo ad praetorem trahor,Plaut. Poen. 3, 5, 45 (cf.: “obtortā gulā de convivio in vincla abripi jussit,Cic. Verr. 2, 4, 10, § 24); Plaut. Curc. 5, 3, 15; Liv. 4, 53, 8.—
II. Meton., of the neck of a flask, bottle, Cato, R. R. 88, 1; Phaedr. 1, 26, 10; Plin. 17, 21, 35, § 161; 28, 11, 48, § 174.—Of the poppy, Verg. A. 9, 436.—Of the middle part of Mount Parnassus, Stat. Th. 9, 643.
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