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concĭto , āvi, ātum, 1, v. freq. a. concieo,
I.to move violently, to put in violent or quick motion, to stir up, rouse up, excite, incite, shake.
II. Trop. (class. and very freq. in prose and poetry).
A. Aliquem, to rouse, urge, impel one to any act, feeling, etc., to move strongly, to influence, stir up, instigate, etc.; constr. with acc. pers. and ad, in, adversus, the inf. and absol.
A. (Acc. to I.) Violently moved, i. e. rapid, swift, quick: “equo concitato ad hostem vehitur,at full speed, Nep. Dat. 4 fin. (more freq. citato equo; v. 2. cito, P. a.): “quam concitatissimos equos immittere jubet,Liv. 35, 5, 8: “conversio caeli concitatior,Cic. Rep. 6, 18, 18; so, “cursu,Liv. 35, 29, 6: “concitatissimus corporis motus,Quint. 2, 11, 4.—
1. (Acc. to 1.) Quickly, rapidly: “agitur pecus,Col. 6, 6, 4.—
2. (Acc. to 2.) Impetuously, ardently (most freq. in Quint.): “dicere,Quint. 8, 3, 40; 10, 2, 23; 11, 3, 23; “12, 10, 71: itur,id. 11, 3, 133.—Comp.: “dicere,Quint. 1, 8, 1; 3, 8, 68; 9, 4, 130: “movere adfectus,id. 12, 10, 26.— *Sup.: raperet ventus, Aug. Civ. Dei, 5, 26.
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