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in-ductĭo , ōnis, f. id.,
I.a leading or bringing into, introducing, admission (class.).
I. Lit.: “nos aquarum inductionibus terris fecunditatem damus,Cic. N. D. 2, 60, 152: “horum (juvenum in circum),introduction, exhibition, Liv. 44, 9, 5; “so on the stage: ficta personarum,Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205: “prima trullis frequentetur inductio,a plastering, Pall. 1, 15.—Of a striking out, erasing of writing (cf. induco, 1. C. 3.): “lituras, inductiones, superductiones ipse feci,Dig. 28, 4, 1.—
B. Transf., concr.
1. An awning drawn over a theatre to protect the audience from the sun, Vitr. 10 praef.
2. A fomentation, Cael. Aur. Acut. 2, 27, 216.—
II. Trop.
A. In gen. (acc. to induco II. B. 2. b.), a purpose, resolution, inclination, intention: “animi,Cic. Q. Fr. 1, 11, 32; id. Fam. 1, 8, 2: “cedet profecto virtuti dolor et animi inductione languescet,id. Tusc. 2, 13, 31.—
B. In partic., rhet. t. t.
1. Induction, a mode of reasoning from known particulars to generals, the Gr. ἐπαγωγή, Cic. Top. 10, 42; id. Inv. 1, 31, 51; Quint. 5, 10, 73; 5, 11, 2 sq.: “erroris,id. 9, 1, 31.—
2. Personarum ficta, = προσωποποιΐα, the introduction of a fictitious person, Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205.—
3. Erroris inductio, = ἀποπλάνησις, a leading into error, misguiding, Cic. de Or. 3, 53, 205.—
4. An assumption, supposition, Prisc. 1144 P.
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