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Prŏmētheus (trisyl. ), ĕi and ĕos, m., =Προμηθεύς (the Forethinker),
I.a son of Iapetus and Clymene, brother of Epimetheus, and father of Deucalion. He formed men of clay, and animated them by means of fire brought from heaven; “for which he was fastened to Caucasus, where a vulture, or, as some say, an eagle, fed upon his entrails, until, at last, it was slain by Hercules,Cic. Tusc. 3, 31, 76; Auct. Her. 4, 6, 9; Hor. C. 1, 16, 13; Ov. M. 1, 82; Hyg. Fab. 54; 144; Verg. E. 6, 42; Prop. 3, 3, 29 (4, 4, 7); Mart. 11, 85, 9; Stat. Th. 11, 478; Lact. 2, 10, 5.—Poet., transf., of a skilful potter, Juv. 4, 133.—Hence,
A. Prŏmēthēus , a, um, adj., of or belonging to Prometheus, Promethean: “juga,” i. e. the Caucasus, Prop. 1, 12, 10; “also called rupes,Mart. 9, 46, 3: “fibra,of Prometheus, Val. Fl. 7, 356: “creta, Col. poët. 10, 59: lutum,Mart. 10, 39, 4: “cruor,Ov. Am. 2, 16, 40: “manus,Stat. Th. 8, 305.—
B. Prŏmēthĭădes , ae, m. patron., the son of Prometheus, Deucalion, Ov. M. 1, 390.
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