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transcendo or trans-scendo , di, sum, 3, v. a. and n. scando,
I.to climb, pass, cross, or step over, to overstep, surmount.
I. Lit. (freq. and class.; cf.: supero, transgredior).
B. Act.: fossam transire et maceriam transcendere conantur. Caes. B. G. 7, 70: “fossas,id. B. C. 3, 46: “valles,id. ib. 1, 68: “Caucasum,Cic. Rep. 6, 20, 22: “Alpes,id. Cat. 4, 3, 6; Liv. 5, 34, 8; 5, 35, 1: “Apenninum,id. 22, 1, 1: “Taurum,Just. 11, 8, 2: “flumen exercitu,Tac. A. 4, 44: “limen,Prop. 1, 14, 19 et saep.—
II. Trop., to pass over, to overstep, surpass, exceed, transcend (rare; not in Cic.).
A. Neutr.: “ad leviora,to pass over, make a transition, Quint. 7, 1, 21: “ad majora,Vell. 2, 130, 3: ex minore aetate in majorem, Hyg. ap. Gell. 16, 6, 15. — Absol.: “ut non abrupte cadere in narrationem, ita non obscure transcendere,Quint. 4, 1, 79. —
2. To excel, exceed, surpass, transcend: “aetatem primae juventae,Col. 1, 8, 3: “at tu transcendes, Germanice, facta tuorum,Sil. 3, 607: “annos factis,id. 4, 428: “florentes annos viribus,id. 1, 226: “vota transcendi mea,Sen. Thyest. 912: “aliquem aetate,id. Troad. 702.
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