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Volcānus (less correctly Vulc- ), i, m.
I. Lit., Vulcan, the fire-god, son of Jupiter and Juno, Cic. N. D. 3, 22, 55 sq.; 1, 30, 83; Caes. B. G. 6, 21; Hor. C. 1, 4, 8; 3, 4, 59; id. S. 1, 5, 74; Ov. M. 7, 437.—Hence,
A. Vol-cānĭus (Vulc- ), a, um, adj., of or relating to Vulcan, Vulcanian: vis, i. e. fire, Lucil. ap. Non. p. 528, 10; so, “acies,a conflagration, Verg. A. 10, 408; “and pestis,Sil. 14, 423: “arma,Cic. Tusc. 2, 14, 33; cf.: “munera, currus,Ov. M. 2, 106: “Lemnos,sacred to Vulcan, id. ib. 13, 313: “insulae,Cic. N. D. 3, 22, 55.—
B. Volcānālis (Vulc- ), e, adj., of or belonging to Vulcan: “flamen,Varr. L. L. 5, § 84 Müll.—As subst.: Vol-cānālĭa , ium, n. (sc. festa), the yearly festival of Vulcan, celebrated on the 23d of August, Varr. L. L. 6, § 20 Müll.; Col. 11, 3, 18; 11, 3, 47; Sall. Fragm. ap. Non. p. 489, 36; Plin. 17, 27, 47, § 260; Plin. Ep. 3, 5, 8.—
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