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τὰ Κάρνεια). A festival celebrated in honour of Apollo Carneus (“the protector of flocks”) as early as the time of the immigration of the Dorians. In keeping up the celebration, the Dorians characteristically gave it a warlike colour, by transforming their original pastoral deity into the god of their fighting army. The Carnea lasted nine days, from the 7th to the 15th of the month Carneus (August-September). The proceedings symbolized the life of soldiers in camp. In every three phratriae or obae nine places were set apart, on which tents or booths were put up. In these tents nine men had their meals in common. All ordinary proceedings were carried on at the word of command, given out by a herald. One part of the festival recalled its originally rural character. This was a race, in which one of the runners, supposed to symbolize the blessings of harvest, started in advance, uttering prayers for the city. The others, called “vintagerunners,” pursued him, and if they overtook him the occurrence was taken as a good omen; if they failed, as a bad one. After the twenty-sixth Olympiad (B.C. 676) a musical contest was added, at which the most celebrated artists in all Greece were accustomed to compete. The first artist who sang at this contest was Terpander (q.v.).

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