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TALA´RIA (πτερόεντα πέδιλα), coverings for the feet, either boots or sandals, with small wings attached. They are represented in ancient art and literature as the attributes of Hermes (Il. 24.340; Od. 5.44; Verg. A. 4.239, Mercury) and of Perseus (Hes. Scut. 216-220; Ov. Met. 4.664 ff.), and had the property of carrying their wearers through the air, over land and sea. On the monuments, Hermes is often (though not invariably) depicted as wearing these winged boots or sandals (see e. g. Furtwängler, Vasenk. 1753, 2182, 2345; Couze, Heroen-u. Göttergest., Taf. 71, 1; Overbeck, Gal. her. Bildw., Taf. 15, 12). In the Hellenistic and Roman periods the wings are sometimes attached to the bare ankles of Hermes or Mercury (e. g. Baumeister, Denkm. art. Hermes, fig. 740 = Mus. Borb. 6.2). On the resting Hermes at Naples (Baumeister, Denkm. art. Hermes, fig. 738; see also woodcut to the present article) the wings are attached by straps to the feet of Hermes. It should be noted that on

Foot with talaria. (From statue of Hermes at Naples.)

early Greek vase--paintings Hermes is found wearing boots, to the upper rim of each of which is attached a curved object. This appears to be a strap for pulling on the boot, and not a rude representation of a wing (Roscher, λεχικον, art. Hermes, p. 2400 ;--Baumeister, Denkm. art. Athena, fig. 171; ib. art. Herakles, fig. 722; ib. art. Dreifuss-und Dreifussraub, fig. 512). Examples of the talaria of Perseus may be seen on the early vase figured in Monumenti, vol. x. pl. 52 = Rayet and Collignon, Hist. de la Céramique, p. 75, fig. 38; see also Baumeister, op. cit., art. Perseus, fig. 1439, 1440.

[W--K W--H.]

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