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ARBOR INFE´LIX

ARBOR INFE´LIX As applied to trees, felix and infelix imply “fruit-producing” or the reverse (Paul. ex Festo, p. 92; Verg. G. 2.81; Plin. Nat. 24.68). “Infelices (se. arbores) autem existimantur damnataeque religione quae neque seruntur unquam neque fructum ferunt” (Plin. Nat. 16.108). Those trees also which bore black berries and black fruit, and were accordingly sacred to the gods of the lower world, were called infelices (Macr. 2.16.2). Such trees appear to have been used for the patibulum and crux (Cic. Rab. Perd. 4, 13; Liv. 1.26. See generally Rein in Pauly, s. v.).

[L.C.P]

hide References (6 total)
  • Cross-references from this page (6):
    • Cicero, For Rabirius on a Charge of Treason, 13
    • Cicero, For Rabirius on a Charge of Treason, 4
    • Vergil, Georgics, 2.81
    • Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 24.68
    • Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 16.108
    • Livy, The History of Rome, Book 1, 26
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