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APUA´NI

Eth. APUA´NI a Ligurian tribe, mentioned repeatedly by Livy. From the circumstances related by him, it appears that they were the most easterly of the Ligurian tribes, and occupied the upper valley of the Macra about Pontremoli, the tract known in the middle ages as the Garfagnana. They are first mentioned in B.C. 187, when we are told that they were defeated and reduced to submission by the consul C. Flaminius; but the next year they appear again in arms, and defeated the consul Q. Marcius, with the loss of 4000 men and three standards. This disaster was avenged the next year, but after several successive campaigns the consuls for the year 180, P. Cornelius and M. Baebius, had recourse to the expedient of removing the whole nation from their abodes, and transporting them, to the number of 40,000, including women and children, into the heart of Samnium. Here they were settled in the vacant plains, which had formerly belonged to Tanrasia (hence called Campi Taurasini), and appear to have become a flourishing community. The next, [p. 1.164]year 7000 more, who had been in the first instance suffered to remain, were removed by the consul Fulvius to join their countrymen. We meet with them long afterwards among the “populi” of Samnium, subsisting as a separate community, under the name of “Ligures Corneliani et Baebiani,” as late as the reign of Trajan. (Liv. 39.2, 20, 32, 40.1, 38, 41; Plin. Nat. 3.11. s. 16; Lib. Colon. p. 235; Henzen. Tab. Alim. p. 57.) There is no authority for the existence of a city of the name of Apua, as assumed by some writers.

[E.H.B]

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