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CRIU-METOPON (Κριοῦ μέτωπον, Ptol. 3.6.2; Scymn. Ch. Fr. 80; Anon. Peripl. Point. Eux. p. 6; Pomp. Mela, 2.1.3; Plin. Nat. 4.26, 10.30; Avien. 228; Priscian, 92: Aia-burun), the great southern headland of the Crimea, which, looking across the Euxine to the promontory of Casambis on the coast of Asia Minor, divides it, as it were, into two parts by a line which the imagination supplies between the 31st and 32d degrees of longitude, and which, according to the ancients, gave the whole sea the shape of a Scythian bow. The two points of land are so remarkable, that many navigators, as Strabo (ii. p.124, vii. p. 309, xi. p. 496, xii. p. 545) reports, affirmed that they had in sailing between them seen both lands to the N. and S. at once, though the distance between the two capes is 2500 stadia. According to Plutarch (De Flum. p. 28), it was called by the natives Brixaba(Βρίξαβα), which meant Ram's Head. Cape Aia, the southernmost of the three headlands, is described as a very high, bluff, bold-looking land, much like the North Foreland, but much higher, and in a sketch of the coast line it is estimated at about 1200 feet, the same elevation which is assigned to it by Pallas. (Journ. Geog. Soc. vol. i. p. 113.) [E.B.J]

CRIU-METOPON (Κριοῦ μέτωπον, Ptol. 3.2; Scylax; Stadiasm. § § 317, 318; Pomp. Mel. 2.7.12; Plin. Nat. 4.12. s. 20, 5.5. s. 5: Kávo Krío), the SW. promontory of Crete, 125 M. P. from Phycus of Cyrenaica (Plin. Nat. 4.12. s. 20), or two days and two nights' sail. (Strab. x. p.475; Dion Per. 87.) Off this headland lay the three small islands called Musagorae Elaphonesia. (Plin. l.c.).


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