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FAVE´NTIA (Φαουεντία, Ptol.; Φαβεντία, Steph. B. sub voce: Eth. Faventinus: Faenza), a city of Gallia Cispadana, situated on the Via Aemilia, 10 miles from Forum Cornelii (Imola), and the same distance from Forum Livii (Forli). (Plin. Nat. 3.15. s. 20; Strab. v. p.217; Ptol. 3.1.46; Itin. Ant. pp. 126, 287.) It is noted in history as the place where Carbo and Norbanus were defeated with great loss by Metellus, the general of Sulla, in B.C. 82. (Appian, App. BC 1.91; Vell. 2.28; Liv. Epit. lxxxviii.) With this exception, we find little notice of it in history; but it appears to have been, under the Roman empire, a municipal town of some consideration, and, in common with many of the other cities on the Via Aemilia, continued to retain its prosperity down to a late period. (Plin. Nat. 7.49. s. 50; Spartian. Hadr. 7; Capit. Ver. 1; Procop. B. G. 3.3; Itin. Hier. p. 616.) Its territory was peculiarly favourable to vines, and, according to Varro, exceeded all other districts in Italy in the quantity of wine produced. (Varr. R. R. 1.2.7; Col. 3.3.2.) Silius Italicus, on the other hand, speaks of it as crowned with pines (8.598). In the time of Pliny, Faventia was celebrated for its manufactures of linen, which was considered to surpass all others in whiteness. (Plin. Nat. 19.1. s. 2.) We learn from the Itineraries that a cross road led from hence across the Apennines direct to Florentia in the valley of the Arnus, a distance of 70 miles. (Itin. Ant. p. 283.) The intermediate stations are unknown, but the road must evidently have ascended the valley of the Lamone (the Anemo of Pliny), which flows under the walls of Faenza.


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