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Atalante

2. The Boeotian Atalante. About her the same stories are related as about the Arcadian Atalante, except that her parentage and the localities are described differently. Thus she is said to have been a daughter of Schoenus, and to have been married to Hippomenes. Her footrace is transferred to the Boeotian Onchestus, and the sanctuary which the newly married couple profaned by their love, was a temple of Cybele, who metamorphosed them into lions, and yoked them to her chariot. (Ov. Met. 10.565, &c., 8.318, &c. ; Hyg. Fab. 185.) In both traditions the main cause of the metamorphosis is, that the husband of Atalante neglected to thank Aphrodite for the gift of the golden apples. Atalante has in the ancient poets various surnames or epithets, which refer partly to her descent, partly to her occupation (the chase), and partly to her swiftness. She was represented on the chest of Cypselus holding a hind, and by her side stood Meilanion. She also appeared in the pediment of the temple of Athena Alea at Tegea among the Calydonian hunters. (Paus. 5.19.1, 8.45.4; Comp. Müller, Orchom. p. 214.)

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