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Di'philus

2. One of the principal Athenian comic poets of the new comedy, and a contemporary of Menander and Philemon, was a native of Sinope. (Strab. xii. p.546; Anon. de Com. pp. xxx. xxxi.) He was a lover of the courtezan Gnatbaena, and seems sometimes to have attacked her in his comedies, when under the influence of jealousy. (Machon and Lynceus Samius, apud Athen. xiii. pp. 579, f., 580, a., 583, f.) He was not, however, perfectly constant. (Alciph. Ep. 1.37.) He is said to have exhibited a hundred plays (Anon. l.c.), and sometimes to have acted himself. (Athen. 13.583f.)

Though, in point of time, Diphilus belonged to the new comedy, his poetry seems to have had more of the character of the middle. This is shewn, among other indications, by the frequency with which he chooses mythological subjects for his plays, and by his bringing on the stage the poets Archilochus, Hipponax, and Sappho. (Ath. xi. p. 487a., xiii. p. 599d.) His language is simple and elegant, but it contains many departures from Attic purity. Respecting his metres, see Meineke. (Hist. Crit. pp. 443, 444, 448.)


Works

The following are the plays of Diphilus, of which we have fragments or titles


Ἄγνοια

(Ath. ix. p. 401a., xv. p. 700d.), which was also ascribed to CALLIADES


Ἀδελφοί

(Ath. xi. p. 499d. e.; Poll. 10.72; Stob. Flor. 108.9)


Ἀλείπτρια

(Etym. Mag. p. 61, 10), which was also the title of a play of Antiphanes, by others ascribed to Alexis


Ἄμαστρις

(Suid. s. v. Ἀθηναίας


Αἱρησιτείχης

of which there was a second edition by Callimachus under the title of Εὐνοῦχος or Στρατιώτης (Ath. xi. p. 496e., 15.700, e.; Antiatticista, pp. 95. 17, 100. 31, 101. 29): the principal character in this play seems to have been such as Pyrgopolinices in the Miles Gloriosus of Plautus, which was perhaps taken from the play of Diphilus


Ἀνάγυρος

(Schol. Ven. ad Il. ί. 123; corrupted in Etym. Magn. p. 744. 48, and Eustath. p. 740. 20)


Ἀνασωζόμενοι

(Ath. xi. p. 499c.; Antiatt. p. 84. 25)


Ἄπληστος

(Ath. ix. p. 370e.)


Ἀποβάτης

(Harpocrat. p. 41. 3; Antiatt. p. 101. 10)


Ἀπολιποῦσα

also ascribed to Sosippus, whose name is otherwise unknown (Ath. iv. pp. 132, e., 133, f. ; Poll. 10.12)


Βαλανεῖον

(Ath. x. p. 446d.; Antiatt. p. 108. 32); Βοιώτιος (Ath. x. p. 417e.)


Γάμος

(Ath. vi. p. 254e.; and perhaps in D. L. 2.120, Διφίλου should be substituted for Σωφίλου; see Menagius, ad loc. and Meineke, Hist. Grit. pp. 425, 426)


Δανα̈́δες

(Erot. gloss. Harpoc. p. 116)


Διαμαρτάνουσα

(Ath. iii. p. 111e.)


Ἐγκαλοῦντες

(Antiatt. p. 110. 18)


Ἐκάτη

(Ath. xiv. p. 645a.; and perhaps Poll. 10.72; see Meineke, p. 453)


Ἑλενηφοροῦντες

(Ath. vi. p. 223a.). Ἐλλεβοριζόμενοι (Antiatt. p. 100. 12)


Ἔμπορος

(Ath. vi. pp. 226, e., 227, e., vii. p. 316f.; Etym. Mag. p. 490. 40, a gap being supplied from the Cod. Barocc. ap. Bekker, Anecd. p. 1445; Harpocrat. p. 130. 22)


Ἐναγίζοντες

(Ath. iv. p. 165f.) or Ἐναγίσματα (Schol. Aristoph. Kn. 960; Photius and Suidas, s. v. Ψωλός


Ἐπιδικαζόμενος

(Poll. 10.137)


Ἐπιτροπή

or more correctly Ἑπιτροπεύς (Antiatt. p. 69)


Ἐπίκληρος

(Poll. 10.99)


Ζωγράφος

(Ath. vi. p. 230f., vii. p. 291f.; Stob. Flor. 105.5)


Ἡρακλῆς

(Ath. x. p. 421e.)


Ἡρως

(Ath. ix. p. 371a.)


Θησαυρός

(Stob. Flor. 12.12)


Θησεύς

(Ath. vi. p. 262a., x. p. 451b.)


Κιθαρῳδός

(Poll. 10.38, 62)


Κληρούμενοι

of which the Casina of Plautus is a translation (Prolog. 31)


Ληυͅνίαι

(Ath. vi. p. 307f., comp. iv. p. 168b.); Μαινόμενος (Poll 10.18)


Μνημάτιον

(Ath. iii. p. 124d.)


Παιδερασταί

(Ath. x. p. 423e.)


Παλλακή

(Etym. Mag. p. 206, 16)


Παράσιτος

(Ath. vi. pp. 236, b., 238, f, 247, d, x. p. 422b.)


Πελιάδες

(Ath. iv. p. 156f.)


Πιθραύστης

probably for Τιθραύστης (Ath. xiii. p. 484e.)


Πλινθοφόρος

(Antiatt. p. 101. 4; and perhaps Eustath. ad Horn. p. 1479. 46)


Πολυπράγμων

(Ath. vi. p. 225a.; Phot. s. v. ῥαγδαῖος


Πύρρα

(Ammon. Diff. Verb. p. 61)


Σάπφω

(Ath. xi. p. 487a., xiii. p. 599d.)


Σικελικός

(Poll. 9.81), which, however, belongs perhaps to Philemon


Σχεδία

(Etym. Mag. p. 683, 24, corrected by Gaisford)


Συναποθνήσκοντες

which was translated by Plautus under the title of Commorientes, and partly followed by Terence in his Adelphi. (Terent. Prol. Adelph. 10; see Meineke, Menand. et Philem. Reliq. p. 1)


Σύντροφροι

(Harpoc. p. 55. 8)


Συνωρίς

of which there were two editions (Ath. vi. p. 247a. c., xiv. p. 657e.; Phot. s. v. Φιμοί ; Harpocr. p. 182. 3)


Τελεσίας

(Ath. xiv. p. 640d.)


Φρέαρ

(Stob. Flor. 116.32)


Φιλάδελφος

or Φιλάδελφοι (Antiatt. p. 80. 29, 110. 17)


Χρυσοχόος

(Phot. s. v. ὀπαία).


Other Fragments

There are other fragments, which cannot be assigned to their proper places.


Rudes
of Plautus

The Rudens of Plautus is a translation of a play of Diphilus (Prol. 32), but the title of the Greek play is not known.


Edition

Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. i. pp. 445-457, iv. pp. 375-430.)

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