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80. Thus the peace and the alliance were concluded, and the Lacedaemonians and Argives1 settled with each other any difference which they had about captures made in the war, or about any other matter. They now acted together, and passed a vote that no herald or embassy should be received from the Athenians, unless they evacuated the fortifications which they held in Peloponnesus and left the country; [2] they agreed also that they would not enter into alliance or make war except in concert. They were very energetic in all their doings, and jointly sent ambassadors to the Chalcidian cities in Thrace, and to Perdiccas whom they persuaded to join their confederacy. He did not, however, immediately desert the Athenians, but he was thinking of deserting, being influenced by the example of the Argives; for he was himself of Argive descent2. The Argives and Lacedaemonians renewed the oaths formerly taken by the Lacedaemonians to the Chalcidians and swore new ones3. [3] The Argives also sent envoys to the Athenians bidding them evacuate the fortifications which they had raised at Epidaurus. They, seeing that their troops formed but a small part of the garrison, sent Demosthenes to bring them away with him. When he came he proposed to hold a gymnastic contest outside the fort; upon this pretext he induced the rest of the garrison to go out, and then shut the gates upon them. Soon afterwards the Athenians renewed their treaty with the Epidaurians, and themselves restored the fort to them.

1 The Lacedaemonians and Argives now act together against the Athenians. They induce the Chalcidian cities and Perdiccas to join them. Evacuation of Epidaurus.

2 See note.

3 Cp. 1.58 med.; 5.31 fin.

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hide References (22 total)
  • Commentary references to this page (17):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 2, 2.12
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 6, 6.76
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.18
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 4, CHAPTER III
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.48
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.53
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.60
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.75
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.83
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction. Chaps. 1-23.
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.131
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.145
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.25
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.31
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.78
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.78
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, Introduction
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 1.58
    • Thucydides, Histories, 5.31
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (2):
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