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104. Meanwhile Gylippus the Lacedaemonian and the ships from Corinth1 were already at Leucas2 hastening to their relief. They were alarmed at the reports which were continually pouring in, all false, but all agreeing that the Athenian lines round Syracuse were now complete. Gylippus had no longer any hope of Sicily, but thought that he might save Italy; so he and Pythen the Corinthian sailed across the Ionian Gulf to Tarentum as fast as they could, taking two Laconian and two Corinthian ships. The Corinthians were to man ten ships of their own, two Leucadian, and three Ambracian, and to follow. Gylippus on his arrival at Tarentum went on a mission to Thurii, of which his father had formerly been a citizen; [2] he had hoped to gain over the Thurians, but failed; he then continued his voyage from Tarentum along the coast of Italy. He was caught in the Terinaean gulf3 by a wind which in this region blows violently and steadily from the north, and was carried into the open sea. After experiencing a most violent storm he returned to Tarentum, where he drew up those of his ships which had suffered in the gale and refitted them. [3] Nicias heard of his approach, but despised the small number of his ships; in this respect he was like the Thurians. He thought that he had come on a mere privateering expedition, and for some time set no watch4.

1 Cp. 6.93 med.

2 Gylippus arrives at Tarentum. Nicias despises the smallness of his force.

3 See note.

4 Cp. 7.1 med.

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  • Commentary references to this page (20):
    • E.C. Marchant, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 7, 7.1
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.10
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.13
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.91
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.5
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.10
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.31
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.46
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.1
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.14
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.24
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.33
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.34
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.38
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.50
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.58
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.60
    • Charles F. Smith, Commentary on Thucydides Book 7, 7.70
  • Cross-references to this page (6):
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (1):
    • Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, Thuc. 7.2
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (2):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 6.93
    • Thucydides, Histories, 7.1
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (12):
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