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47. In giving this advice to Tissaphernes and the King, now that he had passed under their protection,1 Alcibiades said what he really thought to be most for their interests2. But he had another motive; he was preparing the way for his own return from exile. He knew that, if he did not destroy his country altogether, the time would come when he would persuade his countrymen to recall him; and he thought that his arguments would be most effectual if he were seen to be on intimate terms with Tissaphernes. [2] And the result proved that he was right. The Athenian soldiers at Samos soon perceived that he had great influence with him, and he sent messages to the chief persons among them, whom he begged to remember him to all good men and true, and to let them know that he would be glad to return to his country and cast in his lot with them. He would at the same time make Tissaphernes their friend; but they must establish an oligarchy, and abolish the villainous democracy which had driven him out. Partly moved by these messages, but still more of their own inclination, the trierarchs and leading Athenians at Samos were now eager to overthrow the democracy.

1 Alcibiades intrigues with the leading men at Samos for his own restoration He would make Tissaphernes the friend of Athens. But there was one condition:—Abolish the democracy.

2 Cp. 5.43 init.

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  • Commentary references to this page (13):
    • Sir Richard C. Jebb, Commentary on Sophocles: Philoctetes, 385
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.48
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.49
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.74
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.84
    • T. G. Tucker, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 8, 8.90
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.41
    • C.E. Graves, Commentary on Thucydides: Book 5, 5.61
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.41
    • Harold North Fowler, Commentary on Thucydides Book 5, 5.61
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.10
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.115
    • Charles D. Morris, Commentary on Thucydides Book 1, 1.89
  • Cross-references to this page (1):
    • Basil L. Gildersleeve, Syntax of Classical Greek, The Article
  • Cross-references in notes to this page (2):
  • Cross-references in notes from this page (1):
    • Thucydides, Histories, 5.43
  • Cross-references in general dictionaries to this page (6):
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