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[90] were put upon double-quick up the hill, wheeling to the left, into an old stubble-field, where we halted, and our arrival was announced by a shot from a rifle cannon whistling over our heads. The halt did not last two minutes, when Col. Burnside led the different regiments into their positions on the field. The Second Rhode Island entered the field first, to the extreme right, then the Rhode Island battery, six pieces, and the two howitzers of the Seventy-first; and then to the left the Seventy-first, and after it, on its left the First Rhode Island, and then the Second New Hampshire, all formed in line of battle on the top of the hill. This movement was done at double-quick. We were immediately ordered to fall back and lie down, as the discharge from the enemy's battery was very severe.

The First and Second Rhode Island regiments, the Rhode Island battery, and the two howitzers opened fire on the enemy. One of the Rhode Island guns was immediately disabled by a shot from the enemy, and was carried off the field. The Seventy-first lay there as ordered, when an aid from Col. Burnside rode up and asked for the field officers. Col. Martin then ordered us forward.

Prior to this some of the Seventy-first had gone over to the First Rhode Island, and were fighting in their ranks. Boroughs, commissary of the Seventy-first, rode up in front of us, dismounted from his horse, and told the boys to go in and fight on their own account, which they did with a will. Just prior to this Capt. Hart, of Company A, had been wounded and carried from the field; also Capt. Ellis, of Company F. Then Lieut. Oakley came on. Going forward to the brow of the hill he received a shot in the leg of his pantaloons from one of his own men.

Some time after this the firing ceased upon both sides. McDowell, with his staff, then rode through our lines, receiving a cheer from the Seventy-first, and passed down the hill to the left, within 600 feet of the enemy's line. After that the brigade fell back into the woods and rested, taking care of the wounded, and removing them to the hospital; some straggling about over the fields without their muskets, looking on at the fight in other parts of the engagement, which they supposed was the end of the battle, thinking the day was ours.

At about 3 o'clock we formed in line again, on the brow of the hill. It was at this time that a shell fell over my left shoulder, and striking the ground behind me, rebounded upon the foot of private Wm. N. Smith, of Brooklyn, tearing it open. He threw his arms around my neck, and I assisted in carrying him to the hospital.

I returned from the hospital towards my regiment, and met other troops retreating, who informed me that my regiment had gone across the fields. I ran past Sudley Church, then used as the hospital, up the hill, saw a regiment about half a mile ahead, which I supposed was the Seventy-first; took a short cut across the fields, when the cavalry galloped up and arrested me.

They took me back to the hospital, where, during the confusion, I managed to conceal myself under a blanket, which was saturated with blood. Col. Barker, of the Virginia cavalry, then galloped up, and ordered all the unwounded prisoners to be driven to the Junction.

I should think there were about 50 prisoners in all at that point. They left me, supposing I was wounded. A guard was left to guard the hospital. I arose to go in quest of Dr. Peugnet, and found him engaged in amputating the arm of Harry Rockafellow, of S. Street, Philadelphia, of Company F, Seventy-first regiment. Dr. Peugnet requested me to assist him, and he having completed his operation, then amputated the arm at the shoulder-joint of a sergeant of a Maine or a New Hampshire regiment, who had a brother about 17 years of age, who had remained behind to take care of him. This man died under the operation. The next operation was that of my friend Wm. Smith, of Brooklyn, whom I had conveyed to the hospital. His foot was amputated.

During this time Drs. Foster, Swift, and Winston, of the Eighth New York; Dr. De Grant, Dr. Griswold, Dr. Buxton, and the doctor of the Fourth Maine; Dr. Stewart, of Minnesota; Harris, of Rhode Island, and four others whose names I did not learn, one of whom, I believe, was the surgeon of the West Point battery, were attending to the wounded of their respective regiments. Private Tyler, of the West Point battery, had his thigh amputated and died that night. Cornelius, Col. Martin's servant, who was wounded while assisting the colonel to dismount, also died. Mullen, Second Rhode Island, and two of the Seventy-first, whose names I do not know, were found dead next morning.

Gen. Beauregard and Col. Barker came up about 7 1/2 o'clock that evening with 150 prisoners of different regiments, most of whom were Fire Zouaves. He stopped and inquired how our wounded were getting along, while the prisoners were driven towards the Junction by the cavalry. During the night a number of prisoners were brought in, and on Monday morning 30 were sent on, their hands tied together in front with Manilla rope; among them was the lad of 17, from Maine, who plead bitterly to be left to see his brother buried, but was refused.

During the forenoon an order was issued by Gen. Johnston for every one to be removed from Sudley Church to Richmond, via the Junction. All who were not wounded were taken under a tree and tied, as an attack was anticipated. Our doctors strongly remonstrated against this order, as the greater part of our wounded, 280 in number, had not received any attention. Capt. Patrick, of the Virginia cavalry, stated these were his instructions, and he


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