previous next

[297] If they desert their cause they degrade themselves in the eyes of God and of man. They can do your cause no good, nor can they injure ours.

As a great nation, you can accept none but an honorable peace; as a noble people, you can have us accept nothing less. I submit, therefore, whether the mode that I suggest would not be more likely to lead to an honorable end than such a circulation of a partial promise of freedom.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General Commanding.

headquarters Department of the Ohio, Knoxville, E. T., January 7, 1864.
Lieutenant-General Commanding Forces in East-Tennessee:
sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter dated January third, 1864; you are correct in the supposition that the great object in view in the circulation of the President's proclamation is to induce those now in rebellion against the Government to lay aside their arms and return to their allegiance as citizens of the United States, thus securing the reunion of States now arrayed in hostility against one another and restoration of peace. The immediate effect of the circulation may be to cause many men to leave your ranks, to return home or come within our lines, and, in view of this latter course, it has been thought proper to issue an order announcing the favorable terms on which deserters will be received.

I accept, however, your suggestion that it would have been more courteous to have sent these documents to you for circulation, and I embrace with pleasure the opportunity thus afforded to inclose to you twenty (20) copies of each of these documents, and rely upon your generosity and desire for peace to give publicity to the same among your officers and men.

I have the honor to be General, very respectfully,

J. G. Foster, Major-General Commanding.

headquarters Department of the Ohio, January 17, 1864.
Lieutenant-General Longstreet, Commanding Confederate Forces East-Tennessee:
General: I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of your letter of the eleventh inst. The admonition which you gave me against trifling over the events of this great war does not carry with it the weight of authority with which you seek to impress me.

I am, nevertheless, ready to respond, in plain terms, to the suggestions conveyed in your first letter, and which you quote in your second despatch, that I communicate through you any views which the United States Government may entertain, having for their object the speedy restoration of peace throughout the land.

These views, so far as they can be interpreted, from the policy of the Government, and sustained by the people at their elections, are as follows:

First, the restoration of the rights of citizenship to all now in rebellion against the Government who may lay down their arms and return to their allegiance.

Second, the prosecution of the war until every attempt at armed resistance to the Government shall have been overcome.

I avail myself of the opportunity to forward an order publishing proceedings, finding, and sentence in the case of private E. S. Dodd, Eighth Texas confederate cavalry, who was tried, condemned, and executed as a spy.

I also inclose the copy of an order which I have found it necessary to issue in regard to the wearing of the United States uniforms by confederate soldiers.

I have the honor to be, General, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. G. Foster, Major-General Commanding.

headquarters Department of the Ohio, Knoxville, Tenn., January 8, 1864.
General orders, No. 7.

Our outposts and pickets posted in isolated places having in many instances been surprised and captured by the enemy's troops disguised as Union soldiers, the Commanding General is obliged to issue the following order for the protection of his command and to prevent a continuance of the violation of the rules of civilized warfare:

Corps commanders are hereby directed to cause to be shot dead all rebel officers and soldiers wearing the uniform of the United States army captured in future within our lines.

By command of Major-General Foster.

Henry Curtis, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General.
Official: Ed. N. Strong, Major and A. D. C.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Sort places alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a place to search for it in this document.
United States (United States) (2)
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (2)
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (2)

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide People (automatically extracted)
Sort people alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a person to search for him/her in this document.
J. Longstreet (2)
John G. Foster (2)
Edward N. Strong (1)
J. G. Foster (1)
E. S. Dodd (1)
Henry Curtis (1)
hide Dates (automatically extracted)
Sort dates alphabetically, as they appear on the page, by frequency
Click on a date to search for it in this document.
January 17th, 1864 AD (1)
January 8th, 1864 AD (1)
January 7th, 1864 AD (1)
January 3rd, 1864 AD (1)
11th (1)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: