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[120] channels. Pieces of the head-board were driven through the fire-room ventilators.

Lieutenant Prentiss and two men were wounded by this shot.

In the rigging fore-peak halliards, end of main stay and port ridge rope shot away.

I also report the following expenditure of ammunition:

Seventeen shells, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle; six solid shot, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle; eight solid shot, eleven-inch; seven shrapnel, eleven-inch; twenty-five shells, eleven-inch; four canister, eleven-inch; seven grape, eleven-inch; forty-seven shells, thirty-two-pounder; three solid shot, thirty-two-pounder; forty-seven shells, twelve-pounder rifle howitzer; one hundred and seventy percussion-primers; twenty-three cartridges, one hundred and fifty pounder rifle, sixteen pounds; eight cartridges, eleven-inch, twenty pounds; forty-three cartridges, eleven-inch, fifteen pounds; fifty cartridges, thirty-two-pounder, nine pounds; forty-seven cartridges, twelve-pounder rifle howitzer; four shells, twenty-four-pounder howitzer.

The slide of starboard twenty-four pounder howitzer was found to be rotten, and after the first few rounds, was rendered totally unfit for use. With this exception, the battery is in as good condition for service as before the action.

Very respectfully, etc.,

O. A. Batcheller, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding Monongahela.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864.
sir: I have to report that during the engagement with the enemy to-day, we received no damage in the Engineer's Department, with the exception of a shot through fireroom ventilator, and one through the smoke-pipe.

At the time we ran into the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, the engines were making sixty-two revolutions per minute, with thirty pounds steam and throttle-valve wide open.

The engines worked well, and every engineer, fireman, and coal-heaver performed their respective duties in a highly satisfactory manner.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. Kutz, Chief Engineer. Commander J. H. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela.

U. S. S. Monongahela, Mobile Bay, Aug. 10, 1864.
sir: The following persons, wounded in the action of the fifth instant, were sent to the Naval Hospital at Pensacola.

Lieutenant R. Prentiss, both legs, left one amputated.

Michael Smith, boy, scalp.

Wm. Feeney, private marine, contusions.

I am, respectfully,

David Kindleberger, Surgeon U. S. Navy. Commander James A. strong, Commanding U. S. S. Monongahela.


Report of Commander Wm. E. Le Roy.

U. S. Steam-sloop Ossipee.
Admiral: I have the honor to report that in passing the forts, and in the attack upon the iron-clad Tennessee, this ship was struck four times in the hull and several times in the rigging, fortunately without disabling the ship. Our stem is somewhat injured by running against the Tennessee. Our casualties I am pleased to report as small. When about running down the Tennessee, she displayed a white flag, but not in time to prevent my colliding with her; having been so disabled by the fire of the fleet and unable longer to continue the contest, and I was fortunate in receiving her surrender from Commander Johnston, her Commander--Admiral Buchanan being wounded — a prize to the fleet under your command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

Wm. E. Le Roy, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
Admiral: In my report of the part this ship took in the passage of Fort Morgan yesterday, I neglected to allude to the efficient manner in which Lieutenant Commander George W. Brown, with the Itasca lashed alongside of me, performed his duty of piloting both vessels, etc.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Wm. E. Le Roy, Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay.

U. S. S. Ossipee, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of damages received by this vessel in the late engagement with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram Tennessee.

Part of fore-foot gone, occasioned by collision with the Tennessee. One shot, a hundred and thirty pounder, passed through forward starboard section port and ship's side, destroying a knee in the boatswain's room, also carrying away the bulkheads of same and issuing room. Another shot passed through ship's side and starboard forward coal-bunker. One shot passed through the chain-armor, first forward of starboard gangway at water's edge, through ship's side and starboard coal-bunker, landing in port coal-bunker, passing within three inches of the steam-pipe. Also a shot-hole through ship's side and water-ways, under the starboard main channels; the shot carried away one chain-plate, and badly splintered the water-ways. The shot that passed through chain-armor and coal-bunker is a ten-inch columbiad.

Very respectfully,

J. A. Howell, Lieutenant and Executive Officer. Commander W. E. Le Roy, Commanding U. S. Steam-Sloop Ossipee.

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