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[127] was suffered, and there were no casualties among officers or men.

I inclose the report of ammunition expended.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. H. Perkins, Lieutenant Commander. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Flag-Ship Hartford.

U. S. Steamship monitor Chickasaw, Aug. 7, 1864.
sir: I have the honor to report the following expenditures of ordnance and ordnance stores in the engagement of the fifth and sixth of August:

Shell expended upon Fort Morgan: seventy-five five-second; fifteen-pound charges, seventy-five: shot, steel, expended upon ram Tennessee, four; shot, cast-iron, forty-eight; twenty-pound charges fifty-two: shell expended upon Fort Powell, twenty-five five-second; fifteen-pound charges, twenty-five: shell expended upon Fort Gaines, fifteen five-second; sixteen ten-second; fifteen-pound charges, thirty-one; percussion primers expended, one hundred and ninety; lock-strings expended, two; sponges, two; rammers, one.

Very respectfully,

John A. Mcdonald, Gunner. Lieut. Commander G. S. Perkins, Commanding U. S. Steamship Chickasaw.


Report of Lieutenant Charles L. Huntington.

U. S. S. Sloop Oneida, Mobile Bay, August 6, 1864.
sir: Commander Mullany having been seriously wounded, it devolves upon me to make a report of the part taken by the Oneida in the engagement with Fort Morgan and the enemy's vessels on the fifth instant.

I have but few data to guide me, Mr. Ebbetts, the Captain's Clerk, having been required below, after Commander Mullany received his wound.

About half-past 3 A. M., our consort, the Galena, came alongside, and we proceeded to lash the ships together.

At ten minutes past four, we got under way in obedience to signal, and took our station in line as per diagram furnished to the commanding officers.

At five minutes past seven A. M., Fort Morgan opened fire, and at fiteen minutes past seven we opened with the thirty-pounder Parrott from our top-gallant forecastle, the Galena also firing with her one-hundred pounder Parrott rifle.

At twenty-five minutes past seven we commenced firing fifteen-second and ten-second shell from the eleven-inch pivot-guns. At forty-five minutes past seven opened with our entire starboard broadside with five-second shell, also firing two-second eleven-inch shrapnel when abreast the Fort. As the Oneida was the sternmost of the line, we had a good opportunity to observe the effects of the grape fired by the vessels ahead, and it appearing to fall in the water, it was determined to use only five-second shell and shrapnel with short fuze.

Fort Morgan fired very vigorously upon us, and sustaining as we did for a while the fire of all its guns, the damages to the ship are very severe. At fifty minutes past seven a seven-inch rifle-shell passed through the chain-armor and the ship's side at the water-line into the starboard boiler, exploding there. Nearly the whole watch below of firemen and coal-heavers were scalded to death, or disabled by the escaping steam. This accident caused only a very temporary excitement on the part of the guns' crews near the fire-room and engine-room hatches, and the guns were gallantly served and fired while the steam was escaping. About this time also a seven-inch rifle-shell entered at the water-line, exploded in the cabin, cutting both wheel-ropes; the relieving tackles were immediately manned and worked very promptly and skilfully under the supervision of Alexander Lowe, Boatswain's Mate.

Observing the enemy's iron-clad ram Tennessee to be approaching us, the guns were ordered to be loaded with increased charge of powder and solid shot. She passed alongside of us not more than two hundred yards distant, attempting to discharge her guns. Fortunately the primers failed to explode the charges in the guns three times, and she only succeeded in giving us one shot, which struck the after eleven-inch pivotgun on the chase.

Both train-tackles and one out-tackle of the forward eleven-inch gun having at this time been shot away, and the carriage of number five eight-inch gun having been disabled, we were only able to fire the after eleven-inch gun. The shot from this gun struck the ram.

The ram passing astern, delivered two raking fires into us, one of which disabled the twelve-pounder howitzer on the poop, severely wounding Commander Mullany; the effect of the other one I am unable to state, but think the only damage from it was to our rigging.

The command of the ship now devolved upon me, and the management of the two vessels upon Lieutenant Commander Wells of the Galena.

The battery was gallantly served while passing the forts, but the enemy raked us several times after our guns could not be brought to bear.

In passing the Fort we received a shell forward on the berth-deck which exploded, knocking out a dead-light on the port side, starting a fire on top of the magazine. Owing to the presence of mind of Acting Ensign Hall, commanding the powder division, and Gunner Wm. Parker, the fire was promptly extinguished, and the supply of powder was as rapid as ever before.

At thirty-five minutes past eight signal was made that the captain was wounded, and also that our boiler was disabled; not being answered from the flag-ship, hauled down signals. About a quarter past nine repeated signals, and they were not answered, but signal was made from the flag-ship to run down at full speed the enemy's principal vessel. Answered the signal, but I am sure the Admiral understands we could not obey it — we had no speed.

At ten o'clock A. M., the Itasca, Lieutenant Commander Brown, took us in tow and carried


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