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[193]

Of the Louisiana regiments then with Quarles we snatch a glimpse through the smoke of battle in the report of the gallant Cleburne of the fight of May 27th, near New Hope church: ‘Quarles' brigade was conducted to the rear of Lowry, and formed as a second line. The Fourth Louisiana, Colonel Hunter, finding itself opposite an interval between the two regiments of Lowry's line, advanced with great spirit into the field, halted and delivered a very effective fire upon the enemy in front After some minutes Quarles withdrew his regiment and formed it behind the field, where they continued their fire across it.’ In the same battle the Thirtieth relieved the Thirty-ninth Georgia at the front.

Next followed the fighting at Kenesaw mountain,1 the attempt to hold the Chattahoochee, the retreat across it, the relief of General Johnston by Gen. John B. Hood, and the fierce battles of Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, and Ezra Church, July 20th to 28th.

During these operations Gibson's brigade was in the division commanded by General Clayton, Stewart having corps command until S. D. Lee arrived, July 27th. Gibson's brigade took part in the attack from the intrenchments on the 22d; and on the 28th, according to General Gibson's report, was led by Colonel Von Zinken against the enemy strongly posted, where the men fought gallantly and lost heavily. Lieut.-Col. Thomas Shields and Maj. Charles J Bell, of the Thirtieth, fell at the head of the regiment, the former with the colors in his hands within a few feet of the enemy's breastworks. Lieut. W. B. Chippendale, of the same gallant regiment, was killed and Captain Becnel mortally wounded. Lieut. W. J. Clark, Nineteenth, and Lieut. W. G. Jeter, Fourth, and Capt. W. H. Sparks, First, were killed, and Lieutenant

1 During the operations near Kenesaw, the armies of Mississippi and of Tennessee suffered a heavy blow in the death of Lieut.-Gen Leonidas Polk. The united armies, though facing desperate perils, took time to mourn the bishop of Louisiana. He had ever been a pillar of strength to his people. Gentle in peace and undaunted in the field, he is remembered as the militant bishop of the Confederacy.

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