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[159] made in their ranks. * * * But they at once closed and came steadily on never halting, never wavering, right through the woods, over the fence, through the field, right up to our guns, and sweeping everything before them, captured our artillery and cut our whole division to pieces.

At every other point than the centre the attack seems to have been barren of any material results. Starting in well, yet the assault on the enemy's left flank failed, because, by reason of the swollen condition of the water, General Huger was unable to move his division to the proper place. At the same time the difficulties that impeded the advance of General G. W. Smith, was scarcely less formidable, and he failed to break the enemy's right flank, though desperate and bloody efforts were made. According to the plan of attack, Generals D. H. Hill and Longstreet assailed the centre of the enemy's line of entrenchment; and it was at this point-notwithstanding the boggy condition of the ground and the great impediment of tangled undergrowth — that the attack was successful, and the flight of the enemy continuous from one line of works upon another for a distance of two miles, when night put an end to the conflict. Among the killed at Seven Pines was Major Edwin J. Christian, elected at the reorganization about two weeks before; Captain C. C. Blacknall, of of Company G, then became Major of the regiment, Isaac J. Young, succeeding to the Captaincy of Company G. Major Christian was a native of Montgomery county—a gallant soldier, while in all relations of his life he had borne a high and honorable name. Captain Ambrose Scarborough, of Company C, though written as among the killed in the battle, fell on the afternoon preceding while leading a reconnoitering party. A native also of Montgomery county, his career had been alike honorable in peace and war. The officers wounded in the battle were, Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Johnston, Captain William Johnston, Captain I. J. Young, Lieutenant McDonald. Lieutenants Luria and Knott, both of Granville, were killed. The killed of privates and non-commissioned officers numbered thirty-five, while seventy-eight was the number of the same ranks wounded. These figures are taken from Moore's Roster, and we believe, are about the actual casualties. Lieutenant-Colonel Johnston, was wounded in the arm, face and neck, had his horse killed under him, and was shot down within fifty feet of where the breastworks and artillery were. From divers causes, sickness mainly, the regiment was able to go into action at Seven Pines, with only about two hundred and twenty-five men, according to the statement of Captain

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Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (2)
Granville, N. Y. (New York, United States) (1)

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