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Self-sacrifice.

An act performed in 1862 shows the true patriotism of the man. General Huger was in command of Roanoke Island and Mr. Benjamin was filling the post of Secretary of War. A requisition for powder was made and was not filled. This was twice repeated without avail, and Roanoke Island fell. An investigation was ordered by Congress, and it took but a few seconds for the Secretary to inform the committee that the powder had not been forthcoming for the best of reasons—there was none to send. The question then arose as to what might be the probable effect upon Congress and the people in general of this disclosure of the Confederacy's limited resources. It was decided that this would never do, and the committee was in a quandary. At Mr. Benjamin's own suggestion the committee recommended that he be censured by Congress for neglect of duty. History contains no parallel of such patriotism.

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Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (2)

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Judah Phillips Benjamin (2)
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