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[152] whirring by his ears and lead in his heart. It was not until the doubtful fight was ended that he knew that the other son still lived. Brutus of old was no more true than Hampton.

The women of the Prestons, the Chestnuts, and many another Carolina family proved the truth of good old blood. One gentle old Carolina lady, calm and tender of heart, was as heroic as Hampton. A veritable ‘mother in Israel,’ she was as Roman as he. What one in Judea or the seven-hilled city sent seven spears to victory for Joshua or David—for Scipio or Caesar? Yet this Christian mother of the South hear the thunder of hostile guns without one tremor, nursed her children, torn by their shells, without repining, but with perfect trust in the hand of the One Dispenser.

Mrs. Charles Thompson Haskell (Sophia Langdon Cheves, daughter of Colonel Langdon Cheves) had seven sons in the army around Richmond when I met her at Mrs. Stanard's, in one of the several visits she made to tend their wounds. All of them had been privates in the army before the firing on Sumter. She was ever quiet, but genial, hiding what suspense and anguish held her, making, unknowingly, great history for her State and for all time.

The eldest son was Langdon Cheves Haskell, who served on the staff of General Maxey Gregg, later on the staff of General A. P. Hill, and surrendered at Appomattox as captain on the staff of ‘Fighting DickAnderson, of his own State. He married Miss Ella Wardlaw, of Abbeville, dying in 1886, and leaving three sons and one daughter, all adults.

Charles Thompson Haskell was the second son, a captain in the First Carolina Regulars, and was killed on Morris Island when Gilmore landed to attack Charleston in July, 1863. He, happily, left no widow.

The next was William Thompson Haskell. He was captain of Company H, First South Carolina volunteers, and died at the charge of that corps at Gettysburg while commanding under A. P. Hill.

Alexander Cheves Haskell lived through the day of Appomattox. He was colonel of the Seventh South Carolina Cavalry,

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