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[p. 3] ‘yellow day,’ that eight men and one officer answered roll call and started for muster. The largest company in the regiment mustered only twenty-eight men on the opening day. On the following Wednesday, orders came from headquarters that each company must have at least thirty men or be ‘broken.’ Sergt. Porter was sent home and came back at midnight with fifteen men; ten more came in the morning, and the company was saved. Almost immediately after this muster, the company was reorganized; forty men were dropped from the rolls and new men enlisted to fill their places. Capt. George L. Goodale, now of the United States Army, took command. The reorganization and thirty-first anniversary of the Light Guard was celebrated February 13, 1882, by a banquet. At the next muster the general commanding told Capt. Goodale he had no criticism to make.

In 1883, Capt. Goodale resigned, and for a few months Harry J. Newhall commanded, but was succeeded by Joseph E. Clark, formerly lieutenant in Co. H, of Charlestown.

Under Capt. Goodale, and during the first term of Capt. Clark, the Light Guard held the front rank for drill and discipline. It was known as the crack company of the 5th Regiment.

The company attended the ceremonies of unveiling the Washington Monument at Washington, D. C., February 22, 1885. It was the only militia company from Massachusetts in the city. It received commendation from the President and Gen. Sheridan, also from Gov. Robinson of Massachusetts, who expressed his pride at the way it represented the State.

The first indoor prize drill occurred in 1885. The company gave a gold medal, the veterans two silver ones.

The organization supported a drum and fife corps at this time.

After another period of depression Capt. T. C. Henderson took command in 1889. He worked hard to

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