previous next

Enter TOXILUS, from his MASTER'S house, followed by SOPHOCLIDISCA.

TOXILUS
to SOPHOCLIDISCA . Tell her that it's now arranged whence the money is to come. Bid her be of good heart; tell her that I love her exceedingly. When she cheers up, then does she cheer me up. What I've told you to tell her, do you quite understand it?

SOPHOCLIDISCA
Better than your legs1 under-stand you, do I understand it.

TOXILUS
Make all haste, be off home. SOPHOCLIDISCA goes into the house of DORDALUS.

SAGARISTIO
apart . Now I'll make myself a perfect droll towards him; I'll carry myself with arms a-kimbo, and assume a lordly air2. Struts along.

TOXILUS
But who's this that's walking like a two-handled jug3?

SAGARISTIO
apart . I'll spit about me in a dignified style. Spits about.

TOXILUS
Why, surely this is Sagaristio. How are you, Sagaristio? How do you do? Is there any tiny hope in you as to that which I entrusted to you?

SAGARISTIO
in a lofty way . Step this way; it shall be seen to; I would have it done. Advance--move forward.

TOXILUS
What's this swelling4 here upon your neck? Touches his neck.

SAGARISTIO
It's a tumour; forbear to press it, for when any person touches it with a rude hand, pain is the result.

TOXILUS
When did that first come upon you?

SAGARISTIO
To-day.

TOXILUS
You should order it to be lanced.

SAGARISTIO
I'm afraid to lance it before it's ripe, lest it should cause me more trouble.

TOXILUS
I'd like to examine your complaint. Comes nearer.

SAGARISTIO
retreatinq . Be off, and do be careful, will you, of the horns. TOX. Why so?

SAGARISTIO
Because a couple of oxen are here in the purse.

TOXILUS
Do let them out, please; don't starve them with hunger--do let them go to pasture.

SAGARISTIO
Why, I'm afraid that I mayn't be able to drive them back to their stall, lest they should wander.

TOXILUS
I'll drive them back; be of good heart,

SAGARISTIO
You shall be trusted then; I'll lend them you Follow this way, please taking the purse from his neck ; in this there is the money which you were asking me for a short time since.

TOXILUS
What is it you say?

SAGARISTIO
My master has sent me to Eretria to purchase some oxen; at present my Eretria shall be this house of yours.

TOXILUS
You speak quite enchantingly; and I shall very soon return you all the money safe; for now I've arranged and put in readiness all my devices, in which way I'm to get this money out of this Procurer.

SAGARISTIO
So much the better.

TOXILUS
Both for the damsel to be set at liberty, and, still further, for himself to pay the money. But follow me; I have need of your assistance in this affair.

SAGARISTIO
Make use of it just as you please. They go into the house.

1 Better than your legs: "Magis calleo, quam aprugnum collum callet." This pun cannot be appreciated in a literal translation, and another is substituted, for which we are indebted to Warner. The play is upon the resemblance of "calleo," "to understand," "calleo," "to be hard," and "collum," "the hard part," or "brawn, of a boar's neck." Literally translated, it is, "I understand in a better degree than the brawn of a bar's neck is hard." This pun occurs also in the Pœnulus, l. 577.

2 Assume a lordly air: "Amicibor." By the use of the word, he clearly refers to some peculiar way of assuming a jaunty air, probably by tucking up a portion of the dress. In the same way we read in our old Novelists of military men "cocking their hats" to look fierce. To spit with noise and gesture was also considered to give an air of importance.

3 Like a two handled jug: "Ansatus." His arms being a kimbo, he compares him to a jug with two handles.

4 What's this swelling: He has the purse slung round his neck, underneath his dress. This bulges out, and Toxilus asks him what it is. There is a somewhat similar Scene in the Asinaria, between Libanus and Leonida.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License.

An XML version of this text is available for download, with the additional restriction that you offer Perseus any modifications you make. Perseus provides credit for all accepted changes, storing new additions in a versioning system.

load focus Latin (F. Leo, 1895)
hide Places (automatically extracted)

View a map of the most frequently mentioned places in this document.

Visualize the most frequently mentioned Pleiades ancient places in this text.

Download Pleiades ancient places geospacial dataset for this text.

hide References (42 total)
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: